John J. Gallagher, MD

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I greatly appreciate the EP program at Duke developed by John Gallagher that taught me the technical and academic skills needed to sustain a satisfying career

Stephen Hammill, MD, FHRS

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My time spent working with John in electrophysiology was the most rewarding period in my career. John's enquiring mind, passion for excellence and intellectual honesty made him a superb mentor. It was a privilege to work with him. I'm delighted his outstanding contribution is being appropriately recognised.

Warren M. Smith, MBChB

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No message.

Charles Kerr, MD, FHRS

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I was fortunate enough to arrive at Duke in 1977 as an arrhythmia fellow under John Gallagher’s supervision. It was the right place at the right time! Electrophysiologic assessment and operative mapping and ablation had erupted and changed the arrhythmia management landscape. Duke was one of the epicenters of this revolution and John was a key driving force behind the Duke arrhythmia program. I remember John as being exceedingly “quick” with electrocardiographic and electrophysiologic problem solving. More than this, he had a sixth sense for the key question and how to go about answering it. He was very methodical and uncompromising in his desire for excellence and demanded no less of his troops. Balancing between new and potentially risky therapies and the patient’s well-being is never easy and John did this with wisdom and absolute respect for the good of the patient.

I will always be grateful to John for allowing me to share his many research ideas and for allowing me to help care for his patients in new and innovative ways. I left Duke and John with the confidence that I too could make things happen. That is what mentors are about!

George J. Klein, MD

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The year I spent with John Gallagher at Duke learning the principles and practice of clinical electrophysiology was invaluable to my career. There was a major emphasis on WPW Syndrome including intraoperative mapping and surgical cure. Many of the observations regarding WPW Syndrome that we take for granted today were initially worked out by John Gallagher and often confirmed in the operating room. He taught his Fellows how to do systematic studies and clinical research and was one of the most talented electrophysiologists I ever had the opportunity to be with in the EP laboratory. For me it was an exciting time and it was where I met and became friends with my fellow journeymen in EP, David Benditt and George Klein. My very best to John, an electrophysiologist extraordinaire.

Eric N. Prystowsky, MD, FHRS

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One of my greatest teachers! "Are you willing to publish a manuscript with these tracings? If not, repeat them." and so it was for every study.

Augustos O. Grant, MBCHB, PhD

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