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Lack of awareness and treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) puts African Americans at greater risk of death from the condition, according to a new national survey released today by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). The survey findings uncovered significant perception gaps between healthcare providers and consumers when it comes to understanding the condition, its symptoms, risk factors and treatments. Responsible for more than 350,000 U.S. deaths each year, SCA occurs when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. Approximately 95 percent of SCA cases result in death; however, it is proven most deadly in African Americans.

WASHINGTON – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), today released the HRS/ACCF Expert Consensus Statement on Pacemaker Device and Mode Selection.The expert consensus statement was developed in collaboration with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, endorsed by the American Heart Association, and published online today as part of the August edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, as well as the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The statement is the first of its kind to specifically address pacemaker device and mode selection, expanding upon the ACC/AHA/HRS 2008 guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

Over the four days of the meeting all the aspects of cardiac arrhythmias, from epidemiology, to pathophysiology, natural history of heart rhythms, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment, will be simultaneously dealt in 11 different rooms by over 400 invited speakers, all internationally renowned leaders in the field of clinical arrhythmology, electrophysiology and cardiac pacing.