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New research has found that bariatric surgery is an effective way to control weight in morbidly obese patients who are at risk for developing atrial fibrillation (AF). Bariatric or weight loss surgery is an operation on the stomach that limits food intake and is typically recommended for patients who are unable to lose weight on their own through diet and exercise. The first study of its kind to look at the relationship between AF and bariatric surgery on a large patient population was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions. View the full study.

A first of its kind randomized trial has found that defibrillator testing (DT) at the time of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is safe, but does not improve clinical shock efficacy or  prevent death. The findings are part of the Shockless Implant Evaluation (SIMPLE) trial, which was designed to answer whether or not routine DT at time of implant actually improves patient outcomes. The results were released today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Misconceptions about atrial fibrillation (AF) are common among people nationwide, according to a recent survey by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). More than half (56 percent) of Americans do not know that AF puts someone at a high risk of having a stroke. People are more likely to assume high risk related to other common factors like smoking, eating fried or fatty foods or drinking a lot of alcohol. HRS calls on San Diego residents to learn the truth about AF and encourages those who suffer from the disorder to talk to their doctors about their increased risk for stroke.

A new study shows how specific factors such as gender, age and mood disorders like anxiety and depression can lead patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) to inaccurately assess their heart rhythm. The study, published in the April edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), is the first-of-its-kind to evaluate demographics, health status and heart monitor data to identify specific factors that predict inaccuracies. Patients with persistent AF, women, older adults and those diagnosed with anxiety or depression were most likely to have inaccurate perceptions by either over-or-underestimating their AF symptoms.

WASHINGTON, DC — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with major implantable pacemaker and ICD manufacturers, demonstrated the effects of emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) readers on common implantable cardiac devices. According to research published in the January edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the observed effects may cause increasing complications as RFID use expands in the medical device field.

WASHINGTON, DC — New multicenter research reveals that female patients fail ablation procedures more often than male patients, according to a study published in the February edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heat Rhythm Society. The study also shows that males undergo catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation five times as often as females and typically with significantly fewer complications.

WASHINGTON, DC — March 1, 2010 – Analysis of ICD patients enrolled in four different trials found patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias (VA) treated only with antitachycardia pacing (ATP) have higher survival rates than VA patients who experienced at least one shock-treated episode. According to research published in the March edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, 80.2% of VA episodes were successfully treated with ATP-only therapy from an ICD.