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As an international leader in science, education and advocacy for cardiac arrhythmias professionals and patients its members and partners include clinicians, scientists, industry and government. Established in 1979 by four doctors who recognized the need to distinguish cardiac pacing and electrophysiology from other areas of cardiology, HRS today now represents more than 5,500 cardiac pacing and electrophysiology professionals in over 70 countries.  With a staff of 45, our organization continues to grow.

Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) itself is usually not life threatening. If left untreated, the side effects of AFib can be potentially life threatening. AFib makes it harder for the heart to pump blood effectively. With the blood moving more slowly, it is more likely to form clots. If the clot is pumped out of the heart, it could travel to the brain and lead to a stroke. This is the cause of about 15 out of every 100 strokes.

Cardioversion is a corrective procedure where an electrical shock is delivered to the heart to convert, or change, an abnormal heart rhythm back to normal sinus rhythm. Most elective or "non-emergency" cardioversions are performed to treat atrial fibrillation (A Fib) or atrial flutter (AFL), non-life threatening abnormal heart rhythms. Cardioversion is used in emergency situations to correct an abnormal rhythm when it is accompanied by faintness, low blood pressure, chest pain, difficulty breathing, or loss of consciousness.

Slow heartbeat (heart rate), called bradycardia, is an arrhythmia, or disorder of the heart’s rhythm. Each day, a normal heart beats about 100,000 times, at a rate any­where from 60 to 100 times a minute. Changes in heart rate caused by activity, diet, medications, and age are normal and common.