Search

WASHINGTON, DC — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with major implantable pacemaker and ICD manufacturers, demonstrated the effects of emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) readers on common implantable cardiac devices. According to research published in the January edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the observed effects may cause increasing complications as RFID use expands in the medical device field.

WASHINGTON, DC — March 1, 2010 – Analysis of ICD patients enrolled in four different trials found patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias (VA) treated only with antitachycardia pacing (ATP) have higher survival rates than VA patients who experienced at least one shock-treated episode. According to research published in the March edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, 80.2% of VA episodes were successfully treated with ATP-only therapy from an ICD.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – According to a sub-study of the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-CRT (MADIT-CRT), females receive a clinically significant benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy devices (CRT-D) compared to men. New research presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, indicates that CRT-D therapy reduces all-cause mortality and heart failure (HF) and death end point in females, but not in males.

WASHINGTON, July 1, 2010 — New large meta-analysis from five primary prevention randomized implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) studies shows a smaller impact of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) on overall mortality in women.  According to research published in the July edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, women in primary prevention ICD trials have the same overall mortality as men, while experiencing significantly less appropriate ICD interventions. With more than 1,600 women, this meta-analysis includes the largest cohort of women to date.  

Lack of awareness and treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) puts African Americans at greater risk of death from the condition, according to a new national survey released today by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). The survey findings uncovered significant perception gaps between healthcare providers and consumers when it comes to understanding the condition, its symptoms, risk factors and treatments. Responsible for more than 350,000 U.S. deaths each year, SCA occurs when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. Approximately 95 percent of SCA cases result in death; however, it is proven most deadly in African Americans.

WASHINGTON – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), today released the HRS/ACCF Expert Consensus Statement on Pacemaker Device and Mode Selection.The expert consensus statement was developed in collaboration with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, endorsed by the American Heart Association, and published online today as part of the August edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, as well as the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The statement is the first of its kind to specifically address pacemaker device and mode selection, expanding upon the ACC/AHA/HRS 2008 guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

Over the four days of the meeting all the aspects of cardiac arrhythmias, from epidemiology, to pathophysiology, natural history of heart rhythms, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment, will be simultaneously dealt in 11 different rooms by over 400 invited speakers, all internationally renowned leaders in the field of clinical arrhythmology, electrophysiology and cardiac pacing.

The meeting will present current and future management on sudden cardiac death, new drug and ablation treatment for atrial fibrillation, pacing and ICD advances, cardiac resynchronization techniques, remote patient monitoring, and advances in neuromodulation for heart failure and hypertension. The well received certificate Cardiac Rhythm Management Course will continue, and new courses on EPS/ECG added.

The 10th Winter Arrhythmia School is a collaboration between the Schulich Heart Program at University of Toronto, New York University, and Montreal Heart Institute. This year the educational program is divided into two streams: a devices stream and an electrophysiology stream, incorporated together for sessions of common interest. The combined sessions will be focused on innovations in device therapies, ablation approaches, as well as anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic pharmacology.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research reveals that abandoning a nonfunctioning lead in an ICD patient is safe and does not pose a clinically significant risk of complication. The lead is the wire placed in the heart that transmits the heart's electrical signals to the defibrillator for interpretation. The new study published in the January edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, suggests that the practice of abandoning nonfunctioning leads does not result in additional risk to the patient and lead extraction should be reserved for cases of system infection or when large numbers of leads have been abandoned.

Pacemaker

844

Pacemakers are devices that are implanted into the body, just below the collarbone, to take over the job of the heart’s own electrical system and prevent slow heart rates. Although they weigh only an ounce and are the size of a large wristwatch face, a pacemaker contains a computer with memory and electrical circuits, a powerful battery (generator), and special wires called “leads.” The generator creates electrical impulses that are carried by the leads to the heart muscle, signaling it to pump.

Defibrillation, or shock, can be the only way to stop certain heart arrhythmias, or irregular heartbeats, before they kill. If the heart beats too quickly, the chambers, or ventricles, will not have enough time to fill with blood and pump blood to the rest of the body, which can cause death. For people at high risk for the deadliest forms of arrhythmias – called ventricular tachycardia and ventricu­lar fibrillation – an internal “shocking” device may be the best protection against sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

An update to this document was published in 2017 and is available at this link.  

May 13, 2009 — An international team of device and lead management experts from North America and Europe wrote this 2009 consensus document on the management of leads in patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Central to this effort was a focus on transvenous lead extraction, including standards for training and for the evaluation of new tools and techniques.

May 5, 2011 — Developed as a joint project with the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), and in collaboration with the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS), a diverse panel of experts in pacemaker and defibrillator management focused on medical procedures that might interfere with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) function.

May 9, 2014 - This expert consensus statement was written by experts and developed in partnership with and endorsed by the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA); and in collaboration with and endorsed by the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS).  Endorsed by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and the Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulacion Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia (SOLAECE)-Latin American Society of Cardiac Pacing and Electrophysiology.

June 26, 2012 — The statement is the first of its kind to specifically address pacemaker device and mode selection, expanding upon the ACC/AHA/HRS 2008 guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

The new statement provides a state-of-the-art review of the field and reports consensus recommendations on pacemaker device and mode selection. It is a guide to facilitate the appropriate use of single vs. dual-chamber devices for patients who already meet guidelines for pacemaker implantation.

May 13, 2015 - The current document is developed from the foundations established by the 2008 HRS Consensus Statement as well as the 2012 International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrocardiography and European Heart Rhythm Association’s Expert Consensus Statement on Remote Monitoring of CIEDs.  The goals of follow-up, definition of hardware, and personnel remain the same and will not be covered in this document except where evolution of remote technologies and responsibilities has occurred. The current document provides new recommendations based on data published since 2008, endorsing the need to maintain consistent follow-up, and outlining the limitations of strictly in-person methods.

The topic covered by this document includes the monitoring of CIEDs with a description of the technology, indications for use, personnel involved in monitoring and the frequency and types of monitoring events. Also covered are issues in regard to data management, regulatory environments, reimbursement and ethical considerations in respect to device inactivation.

This document has been retired and replaced by 2015 "HRS Expert Consensus Statement on Remote Interrogation and Monitoring for Cardiovascular Electronic Implantable Devices."

May 14, 2010 - This document was developed in collaboration with and endorsed by the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM); the American Heart Association (AHA), the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), and the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA). It focuses on patients nearing the end of life and addresses patients who have made a decision for CIED deactivation at other times, as well as the rights and responsibilities of clinicians (and others, such as industry-employed allied professionals) who may not wish to perform deactivation.

November 19, 2015 - The benefits and risks of ICD therapy for patients are directly impacted by the programming and surgical decisions made by the clinician. This expert consensus statement systemically describes four important clinical issues and addresses programming of: bradycardia mode and rate, tachycardia detection, tachycardia therapy, and intraprocedural testing of defibrillation efficacy.

September 14, 2017 — The 2017 HRS Expert Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Device Lead Management and Extraction, developed in collaboration with the ACC, AHA, APHRS, ASA, EHRA, IDSA, LAHRS, PACES, and STS, is intended to help clinicians in their decision-making process for managing leads and builds on the 2009 Transvenous Lead Extraction: Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus on Facilities, Training, Indications, and Patient Management document. It provides practical clinical guidance in the broad field of lead management, including lead extraction.

The document features a clinician summary  (an educational derivative product of the full document) and a pocket card, developed in partnership with Guideline Central and available across multiple platforms, including print, electronic media, and the Guideline Central mobile app. Visit www.guidelinecentral.com  to access the pocket card.

December 13, 2005 — This is the first study designed to look at the relation between patient outcomes and physicians'/hospitals' volume of cardioverter-defibrillator implantation to determine whether implantation should be limited to physicians with high procedural volume.