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WASHINGTON, DC — New multicenter research reveals that female patients fail ablation procedures more often than male patients, according to a study published in the February edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heat Rhythm Society. The study also shows that males undergo catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation five times as often as females and typically with significantly fewer complications.

The vision of the 2013 Women's Career and Leadership Development Conference for Women Cardiologists and Cardiothoracic Surgeons is to diversify the cardiology and cardiothoracic field by creating a vibrant community of women cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons that will strengthen their non-clinical professional skills, provide opportunities to enhance their professional standing, and encourage them to assume leadership positions in the field and within the American College of Cardiology.

The Symposium will focus broadly on emerging technology and therapies to include all phases of the innovation process, (e.g., ongoing or recently completed studies on devices, ablation, and mapping). The program addresses hot topics on basic, pediatric and adult electrophysiology, including multidisciplinary approaches in treatment of AF, HF, and prevention of SCD. Courses on CRT, AF ablation and ECG workshop are included in the program. The program, abstracts and registration information are available on the Symposium website .

The meeting will present current and future management on sudden cardiac death, new drug and ablation treatment for atrial fibrillation, pacing and ICD advances, cardiac resynchronization techniques, remote patient monitoring, and advances in neuromodulation for heart failure and hypertension. The well received certificate Cardiac Rhythm Management Course will continue, and new courses on EPS/ECG added.

The 10th Winter Arrhythmia School is a collaboration between the Schulich Heart Program at University of Toronto, New York University, and Montreal Heart Institute. This year the educational program is divided into two streams: a devices stream and an electrophysiology stream, incorporated together for sessions of common interest. The combined sessions will be focused on innovations in device therapies, ablation approaches, as well as anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic pharmacology.

This course is designed to provide the learner with the most up-to-date review of lead management and to give an in-depth review of indications for lead extraction and management of device infections as well as available tools and technology for extraction. A live extraction case will be featured, followed by a panel discussion by experts in the field.

Program faculty will review detailed illustrative cases with a step-by-step analysis, providing a current, in-depth review of approaches to catheter ablation for the spectrum of cardiac arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation, complex atrial arrhythmias after AF ablation or in congenital heart disease, atrial tachycardia’s and atypical flutters, and ventricular arrhythmias with or without associated heart disease.

BOSTON, May 13, 2009 — Safe and effective management of patients with cardiovascular implantable devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is a complex and evolving issue. To ensure that physicians and facilities are adequately prepared to determine if and when lead extraction is necessary and to give patients the best possible care during these procedures, the Heart Rhythm Society has developed Transvenous Lead Extraction: Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on Facilities, Training, Indications and Patient Management.The consensus statement was released today at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Sessions.

BOSTON, May 14, 2009 — Catheter ablation is now an important therapy option to be considered when trying to control recurrent ventricular tachycardias (VT). To ensure that physicians have up to date knowledge of this evolving therapy, which can be life-saving for some patients, and promote the best patient care, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Rhythm Society have prepared EHRA/HRS Expert Consensus on Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Arrhythmias. The consensus statement was released today at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Sessions.

WASHINGTON —  The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), written in joint partnership with European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society (ECAS), issues an international consensus statement on indications, techniques and outcomes of catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF).

Cardioversion is a corrective procedure where an electrical shock is delivered to the heart to convert, or change, an abnormal heart rhythm back to normal sinus rhythm. Most elective or "non-emergency" cardioversions are performed to treat atrial fibrillation (A Fib) or atrial flutter (AFL), non-life threatening abnormal heart rhythms. Cardioversion is used in emergency situations to correct an abnormal rhythm when it is accompanied by faintness, low blood pressure, chest pain, difficulty breathing, or loss of consciousness.

A normal heartbeat is controlled by a smooth, constant flow of electricity through the heart. A short-circuit anywhere along this electrical pathway can disrupt the normal flow of signals, causing an arrhythmia (an irregular heartbeat). Cardiac ablation is a procedure used to destroy these short-circuits and restore normal rhythm, or to block damaged electrical pathways from sending faulty signals to the rest of the heart.

June 2002 — Based on the Consensus Conference held during the 21st Annual Scientific Sessions of the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology (NASPE; now known as Heart Rhythm Society), this consensus statement covers issues of specific cardiac arrhythmias in children with or without congenital heart disease (CHD), the special needs of children and patients with CHD, and how best to meet these needs.

March 28, 2014 - A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society; developed in collaboration with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.  The goal of this guideline is to establish revised guidelines for optimum management of atrial fibrillation. This guideline supersedes the "2006 ACC/AHA/ESC Guideline for the Management of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation" and the two subsequent focused updates from 2011.

This document has been retired and replaced by the 2017 publication available at this link.

March 2012 — The purpose of the 2012 Consensus Statement is to provide a state-of-the-art review of the field of catheter and surgical ablation of AFib. It reports  on the findings of a Task Force, convened by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society (ECAS) and charged with defining the indications, techniques, and outcomes of this procedure.

May 14, 2009 — This Consensus Statement provides a state-of-the-art review on catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT). It reports on the findings of a Task Force representing the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) charged with defining the indications, techniques, and outcomes of this procedure.

December 10, 2015 - The evolution of LAA occlusion technology has spanned nearly two decades and three FDA panel hearings, leading to FDA approval in 2015. As this technology becomes clinically available to a broader population of patients, it is essential that physician stakeholders establish criteria for the performance of these procedures that will be used in granting initial and ongoing privileges. These criteria are offered to support The Joint Commission mandate that medical staff privileges be granted on the basis of professional criteria specified in the medical staff bylaws to ensure safe and effective patient-centered care.

September 14, 2017 — The 2017 HRS Expert Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Device Lead Management and Extraction, developed in collaboration with the ACC, AHA, APHRS, ASA, EHRA, IDSA, LAHRS, PACES, and STS, is intended to help clinicians in their decision-making process for managing leads and builds on the 2009 Transvenous Lead Extraction: Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus on Facilities, Training, Indications, and Patient Management document. It provides practical clinical guidance in the broad field of lead management, including lead extraction.

The document features a clinician summary  (an educational derivative product of the full document) and a pocket card, developed in partnership with Guideline Central and available across multiple platforms, including print, electronic media, and the Guideline Central mobile app. Visit www.guidelinecentral.com  to access the pocket card.