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WASHINGTON, July 1, 2010 — New large meta-analysis from five primary prevention randomized implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) studies shows a smaller impact of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) on overall mortality in women.  According to research published in the July edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, women in primary prevention ICD trials have the same overall mortality as men, while experiencing significantly less appropriate ICD interventions. With more than 1,600 women, this meta-analysis includes the largest cohort of women to date.  

WASHINGTON, DC, October 1, 2010 — New research suggests that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption may aid in the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in women. According to research published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, intake of up to one drink per day was associated with lower risk of SCD. The study is the first and largest to prospectively explore the role of alcohol consumption on risk of SCD in a female population and investigate how the risk compares to other forms of coronary heart disease (CHD).

WASHINGTON, October 5, 2010 — In a powerful demonstration of collective standing in the healthcare community, more than 40 organizations gathered on Capitol Hill to issue a call to action in reducing sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) deaths. A briefing was organized by the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Coalition (SCAC) and held at the Rayburn House Office Building on the 50th anniversary of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). October is National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month.

WASHINGTON, October 5, 2010 — New research reveals that patients with type 2 diabetes are at a higher risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) after myocardial infraction (MI) than nondiabetic patients. According to research published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, incidence of SCD in diabetic patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction >35% is equal to that of nondiabetic patients with left ventricular ejection fraction of <35%. A secondary analysis indicated that non-sudden cardiac deaths were also higher among diabetics after a heart attack.

Lack of awareness and treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) puts African Americans at greater risk of death from the condition, according to a new national survey released today by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). The survey findings uncovered significant perception gaps between healthcare providers and consumers when it comes to understanding the condition, its symptoms, risk factors and treatments. Responsible for more than 350,000 U.S. deaths each year, SCA occurs when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. Approximately 95 percent of SCA cases result in death; however, it is proven most deadly in African Americans.

WASHINGTON – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), today released the HRS/ACCF Expert Consensus Statement on Pacemaker Device and Mode Selection.The expert consensus statement was developed in collaboration with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, endorsed by the American Heart Association, and published online today as part of the August edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, as well as the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The statement is the first of its kind to specifically address pacemaker device and mode selection, expanding upon the ACC/AHA/HRS 2008 guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

WASHINGTON, DC —More than 250,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). In fact, SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer or AIDS. Yet, according to a recent survey issued by the Heart Rhythm Society, more than 70 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack.

WASHINGTON — New study results reveal underlying causes of nonischemic sudden cardiac death (SCD) – those causes not related to coronary artery disease (CAD) – including alcohol, obesity and myocardial fibrosis.  The study, published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, also reinforces CAD as one of the most prevalent causes of SCD in the general population.  Furthermore, the results establish specific causes of nonischemic SCD in different age groups, including people under the age of 40.

WASHINGTON, October 18, 2011 — In recognition of National Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month, the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Coalition (SCAC), in cooperation with the Congressional Heart and Stroke Caucus, is hosting "Take a Stand Against Sudden Cardiac Arrest," a two-hour event that will teach the basics of Hands-Only CPR and use of AEDs (automated external defibrillators) on Wednesday, October 26, from 4:00pm-6:00pm in the Rayburn House Office Building Foyer.