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 BOSTON – New research reports significant differences between men and women with atrial fibrillation (AF) and the safety of intense physical activity. The study found that both moderate and vigorous levels of exercise are safe for women living with AF. However, vigorous levels of exercise are associated with an increased risk of AF in men. The research, analyzing data from a large-scale or robust patient population of nearly 380,000 patients, was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 36th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Today, Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s (HRS) 36th Annual Scientific Sessions and this year’s leading conference on cardiac arrhythmias commences at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. This year’s meeting will focus on the power of interactivity – how networks, both technological and personal, are connecting to propel the science, discovery, and innovation of the electrophysiology (EP) field.

On February 11, 2015, cardiac arrhythmia health care professionals around the world will celebrate and be recognized for their unique knowledge and skillset during International Board of Heart Rhythm Examiners (IBHRE®) Day. IBHRE Day encourages employers to extend their appreciation to their IBHRE certified employees and offers a platform for the certified professionals to educate the public about their credentials.

For the first time, the relationship between remote monitoring and pacemaker patient survival outcomes is revealed in a study released today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions. The study shows that the utilization of remote monitoring can improve survival outcomes in patients with pacemakers. Furthermore, survival rates improved in patients with the highest engagement rates in remote monitoring, regardless of device type.

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) released Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Patients Who Are Not Included or Not Well Represented in Clinical Trials today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions. The expert consensus statement provides first-of-its-kind guidance on ICD therapy for the management of patient populations who are not well represented in clinical trials and, as a result, not specifically included in existing guidelines. View the consensus statement.

A study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions, reports significant gender and health insurance disparities in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) procedures. For the first time in nearly a decade, the new analysis of ICD implants in the United States shows a majority of implants are performed on people with insurance and more commonly in the male population.

Today, Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s (HRS) 35th Annual Scientific Sessions and this year’s premier conference on cardiac arrhythmias begins at the Moscone Center. Heart Rhythm 2014 takes a profound look into the advancement of medical technology while once again creating a global exchange of ideas and best practices in order to promote optimal patient care worldwide.

A new study has found that adding an electrocardiogram (ECG) to existing pre-participation screening of high school athletes increases the likelihood of identifying disorders associated with sudden cardiac death. By using modern interpretation criteria, screenings resulted in fewer false-positive rates, which leads to more accurate detection. The new findings were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions.

New research has found that bariatric surgery is an effective way to control weight in morbidly obese patients who are at risk for developing atrial fibrillation (AF). Bariatric or weight loss surgery is an operation on the stomach that limits food intake and is typically recommended for patients who are unable to lose weight on their own through diet and exercise. The first study of its kind to look at the relationship between AF and bariatric surgery on a large patient population was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions. View the full study.

A first of its kind randomized trial has found that defibrillator testing (DT) at the time of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is safe, but does not improve clinical shock efficacy or  prevent death. The findings are part of the Shockless Implant Evaluation (SIMPLE) trial, which was designed to answer whether or not routine DT at time of implant actually improves patient outcomes. The results were released today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Misconceptions about atrial fibrillation (AF) are common among people nationwide, according to a recent survey by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). More than half (56 percent) of Americans do not know that AF puts someone at a high risk of having a stroke. People are more likely to assume high risk related to other common factors like smoking, eating fried or fatty foods or drinking a lot of alcohol. HRS calls on San Diego residents to learn the truth about AF and encourages those who suffer from the disorder to talk to their doctors about their increased risk for stroke.

A new study shows how specific factors such as gender, age and mood disorders like anxiety and depression can lead patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) to inaccurately assess their heart rhythm. The study, published in the April edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), is the first-of-its-kind to evaluate demographics, health status and heart monitor data to identify specific factors that predict inaccuracies. Patients with persistent AF, women, older adults and those diagnosed with anxiety or depression were most likely to have inaccurate perceptions by either over-or-underestimating their AF symptoms.

WASHINGTON, DC — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with major implantable pacemaker and ICD manufacturers, demonstrated the effects of emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) readers on common implantable cardiac devices. According to research published in the January edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the observed effects may cause increasing complications as RFID use expands in the medical device field.

WASHINGTON, DC — New multicenter research reveals that female patients fail ablation procedures more often than male patients, according to a study published in the February edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heat Rhythm Society. The study also shows that males undergo catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation five times as often as females and typically with significantly fewer complications.

WASHINGTON, DC — March 1, 2010 – Analysis of ICD patients enrolled in four different trials found patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias (VA) treated only with antitachycardia pacing (ATP) have higher survival rates than VA patients who experienced at least one shock-treated episode. According to research published in the March edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, 80.2% of VA episodes were successfully treated with ATP-only therapy from an ICD.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – A new study based on a large cohort of patients proves strategic programming of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices (CRT-D) reduces shocks. The results are part of a shock reduction late-breaking clinical trial presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions. According to the trial, strategic programming results in overall shock reduction between 17 and 28 percent depending on the programming of specific variables.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – According to a new study released today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, remote monitoring proves effective for earlier detection of arrhythmic events and pacemaker dysfunction in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The study is the first to consider using remote monitoring on elderly patients to detect and treat AF compared to standard follow-up procedures.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – Common herbal and nonherbal supplements, such as garlic, ginkgo and essential fatty acids, contribute to an increased risk of health complications in patients treated with warfarin. According to a new study released today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, eight out of the top ten supplements commonly taken by American consumers have been reported to impact the effectiveness of warfarin and overall safety of the individual.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – African Americans have a significantly lower incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to Caucasians despite a higher prevalence of risk factors for this specific type of arrhythmia. According to a new study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, Caucasians are 60 percent more likely than African Americans to develop AF following heart surgery.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – According to a sub-study of the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-CRT (MADIT-CRT), females receive a clinically significant benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy devices (CRT-D) compared to men. New research presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, indicates that CRT-D therapy reduces all-cause mortality and heart failure (HF) and death end point in females, but not in males.

DENVER, May 14, 2010 – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) has released the first consensus statement for the management of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices in patients nearing end of life or requesting device deactivation. The HRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Management of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) in patients nearing end of life or requesting withdrawal of therapy was written in collaboration with representatives from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM), the American Heart Association (AHA) and the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA). 

WASHINGTON, June 1, 2010 — New study findings prove continuing warfarin therapy during pacemaker or defibrillator implantation in patients with moderate to high thromboembolic risk is safe and cost-effective. According to research published in the June edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, cessation of warfarin with bridging anticoagulation resulted in a higher incidence of bleeding complications and a longer hospital stay.  In addition, patients with temporarily interrupted anticoagulation suffered from a higher risk of transient ischemic attacks (TIA) than those who continued warfarin therapy.

WASHINGTON, July 1, 2010 — New large meta-analysis from five primary prevention randomized implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) studies shows a smaller impact of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) on overall mortality in women.  According to research published in the July edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, women in primary prevention ICD trials have the same overall mortality as men, while experiencing significantly less appropriate ICD interventions. With more than 1,600 women, this meta-analysis includes the largest cohort of women to date.  

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2010 — Released today, a new study on overall workforce trends in the field of cardiac electrophysiology (EP) reveals an increasing demand for EP professionals as a result of shifting demographic trends, evolving health reform policies and improved procedural outcomes. The comprehensive workforce study published in the September issue of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, found substantial growth in the overall volume and complexity of cardiac procedures performed in the past decade.

WASHINGTON, September 1, 2010 — New research released today is the first to find both anatomical and procedural considerations that can lead to the creation of esophageal ulcerations (ESUL) after radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). According to a study published in the September issue of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, patients at high-risk for esophageal injury can be identified based on pre-acquired multislice computed tomography. The study is the largest to provide serial endoscopy data on the esophagus after radiofrequency ablation.

WASHINGTON, DC, September 8, 2010 — The National ICD Registry, a repository of ICD implantation data developed through a partnership of the Heart Rhythm Society and the American College of Cardiology Foundation, has released the National ICD Registry Annual Report 2009. This is the fourth annual review of the Registry and is published in the September edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society.

WASHINGTON, DC, September 21, 2010 — Six cardiovascular societies from around the world today published a statement on live case demonstrations at cardiovascular meetings. The statement is the result of a collaborative effort by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), American College of Cardiology (ACC), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), European Society of Cardiology (ESC), Sociedad Latinoamericana de Cardiología Intervencionista (SOLACI) and Asian-Pacific Society of Interventional Cardiology (APSIC). The document outlines first-of-its-kind standards for institutions and medical practitioners to consider when performing and broadcasting live cardiovascular case demonstrations at medical meetings. The document is published in the HeartRhythm Journal, Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, and Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

WASHINGTON, DC, October 1, 2010 — New research suggests that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption may aid in the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in women. According to research published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, intake of up to one drink per day was associated with lower risk of SCD. The study is the first and largest to prospectively explore the role of alcohol consumption on risk of SCD in a female population and investigate how the risk compares to other forms of coronary heart disease (CHD).

WASHINGTON, October 5, 2010 — In a powerful demonstration of collective standing in the healthcare community, more than 40 organizations gathered on Capitol Hill to issue a call to action in reducing sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) deaths. A briefing was organized by the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Coalition (SCAC) and held at the Rayburn House Office Building on the 50th anniversary of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). October is National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month.

WASHINGTON — The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the international leader in science, education and advocacy for heart rhythm professionals and patients, recently hosted its inaugural two-day research forum to identify opportunities and challenges to advancing research in the United States and abroad in electrophysiology (EP).

WASHINGTON, October 5, 2010 — New research reveals that patients with type 2 diabetes are at a higher risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) after myocardial infraction (MI) than nondiabetic patients. According to research published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, incidence of SCD in diabetic patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction >35% is equal to that of nondiabetic patients with left ventricular ejection fraction of <35%. A secondary analysis indicated that non-sudden cardiac deaths were also higher among diabetics after a heart attack.

In response to the study, Non-Evidence-Based Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Implantations in the United States, published in the January 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) reiterate the importance of research and measurement tools designed to improve patient care. The message and teachings of this important study indicate that substantial variations exist among hospital ICD implantation strategies.

WASHINGTON, November 9, 2010 — According to a new survey, physicians were significantly less comfortable discussing withdrawal of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy compared with other life-sustaining therapies, with approximately half stating that they were not comfortable having these conversations with patients. Similarly, physicians were almost twice as likely to have been involved in withdrawal of therapies such as mechanical ventilation and hemodialysis compared with cardiac devices. The survey, published in the November edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, uncovers a need for more education regarding the legal and ethical parameters guiding cessation of PM and ICD therapy. 

WASHINGTON — Results from a large, worldwide, clinical trial show evidence that a first-of-its-kind pacemaker system is safe and effective to use during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During the trial, no MRI-related complications were reported in patients with the pacemaker system before, during, or after an MRI examination.

WASHINGTON — The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) is aware of the ongoing Department of Justice (DOJ) civil investigation of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) implants and has agreed to assist in an advisory role to lend expertise concerning proper guidelines for clinical decision making. HRS is reviewing information that does not include either identifiable patient or facility level data.

WASHINGTON, December 8, 2010 — The outcome of a recent expert consensus workshop, "NHLBI/HRS Workshop on Prediction and Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death," identifies knowledge gaps and offers six specific research recommendations in high priority areas for sudden cardiac death (SCD) prediction and prevention. In the  In the United States, SCD continues to claim more than 250,000 lives annually and is the cause of half of all heart disease deaths. The special report, Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) Prediction and Prevention: Report from a National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Heart Rhythm Society Workshop, was published in the November 30th issue of Circulation, an official journal of the American Heart Association. 

WASHINGTON, December 13, 2010 – The Heart Rhythm Society, the international leader in science, education and advocacy for heart rhythm professionals and patients, has received notification that the Society’s request for a physician specialty code for cardiac electrophysiology has been approved by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS).

A new study shows that atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of dementia in older adults who have not had a stroke and have normal baseline cognitive function. The meta-analysis, published in the November edition of HeartRhythm,the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, is the first-of-its-kind to observe a large population of patients over a relatively long follow-up period. The study results support an independent longitudinal relationship between the two conditions, therefore associating the presence of AF with greater risk of developing dementia. 

A new Canadian study shows that operating without interrupting warfarin treatment at the time of cardiac device surgery is safe and markedly reduces the incidence of clinically significant hematomas compared to the current standard of care.  The new findings were released today at Heart Rhythm 2013,the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), release the HRS/EHRA/APHRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Inherited Primary Arrhythmia Syndromes. The expert consensus statement presented today at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions, provides the first comprehensive statement of recommendations on the proper diagnosis and management of patients with inherited primary arrhythmia syndromes.

Hugh Calkins, MD, FHRS, CCDS, was named the president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) during the 34th Annual Scientific Sessions, held in Denver last week.  Announced during the Presidents’ Reception on Friday, May 10th, Dr. Calkins now serves as the 35th president of HRS, making Anne M. Gillis, MD, FHRS, the immediate past president. Dr. Calkins is currently a Nicholas J. Fortuin Professor of Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at the Johns Hopkins University of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland.

The National ICD Registry®, a repository of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation data developed through a partnership of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), released the National ICD Registry Report: Version 2.1. The new version expands upon the 2009 Annual Report to now include data on leads and pediatric implants to reflect recent advancements in healthcare. This report is featured online in HeartRhythm, the official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society.

A new study shows young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) also living with an implantable cardioverter- defibrillator (ICD) experience a high level of shock-related anxiety. The multicenter study, published in the June edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, is the first to discover that shock-related anxiety is associated with sexual dysfunction in young adults and calls on healthcare providers to address these issues to improve the quality of life for patients.

BOSTON, May 14, 2009 — Common psychotropic medications such as antipsychotics, antidepressants and benzodiazepines, may contribute to an increased risk of sudden death during an acute coronary event, according to a new study released today at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Sessions. This case-control study is the first of its kind to compare psychotropic medication use in heart attack survivors and victims of sudden cardiac death.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research proves the feasibility of leadless pacing in heart failure patients with ultrasound-mediated stimulation energy. The new study published in the June edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, sought to apply ultrasound-mediated leadless pacing technology in heart failure patients and to evaluate the effects of respiration and body posture on the acoustic window. The study is the first of its kind to demonstrate successful leadless pacing in human subjects with advanced heart failure.

WASHINGTON, DC — The Heart Rhythm Society applauds the passage of H.R. 1380, the “Josh Miller HEARTS Act,” a legislation that establishes a federal grant program to help fund the placement of automated electronic defibrillators (AEDs) at elementary and secondary schools across the country. While also requiring school personnel to receive training in the operation of AEDs, the legislation will increase public awareness of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and the importance of AEDs in schools.

Lack of awareness and treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) puts African Americans at greater risk of death from the condition, according to a new national survey released today by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). The survey findings uncovered significant perception gaps between healthcare providers and consumers when it comes to understanding the condition, its symptoms, risk factors and treatments. Responsible for more than 350,000 U.S. deaths each year, SCA occurs when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. Approximately 95 percent of SCA cases result in death; however, it is proven most deadly in African Americans.

WASHINGTON – New research strongly indicates the need for a revision of criteria to effectively evaluate the presence of right ventricular structural, functional and electrical abnormalities. A recent study, published in the July edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, analyzed the clinical characteristics and diagnostic evaluation including genetic testing of a large group of patients newly identified with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D). The study is the largest of its kind and included over one hundred newly diagnosed ARVC/D patients.

WASHINGTON, DC — The Heart Rhythm Society applauds the introduction of Senate Resolution SRES 220 which calls for the designation of September as National Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Awareness Month. The resolution reinforces the need to raise awareness and garner support for initiatives affecting AF, a condition that impacts roughly 2.2 million Americans.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research reveals T-wave morphology parameters contain predictive value for mortality in the general population, independent of other clinical risk factors. A study published in the August edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, indicates that T-wave morphology parameters may allow health care professionals to better assess arrhythmia vulnerability in patients, and the prognostic value is uniquely related to cardiovascular mortality and seems to be gender specific.

WASHINGTON, DC — The ICD Registry™, a repository of ICD implantation data developed through a partnership of the Heart Rhythm Society and the American College of Cardiology Foundation, has released the ICD Registry Annual Report 2008. This is the third annual review of the Registry and is published in the September edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society.

WASHINGTON – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), today released the HRS/ACCF Expert Consensus Statement on Pacemaker Device and Mode Selection.The expert consensus statement was developed in collaboration with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, endorsed by the American Heart Association, and published online today as part of the August edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, as well as the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The statement is the first of its kind to specifically address pacemaker device and mode selection, expanding upon the ACC/AHA/HRS 2008 guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research shows magnetic interference from portable headphones has a clinically significant impact on the function of life-saving devices, according to a new study published in the October edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society. The study is the largest and most complete of its kind and uncovers a need for greater dialogue between doctors and patients with implanted cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and pacemakers.

WASHINGTON, DC —More than 250,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). In fact, SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer or AIDS. Yet, according to a recent survey issued by the Heart Rhythm Society, more than 70 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack.

WASHINGTON, DC — New findings indicate reduced heart rate recovery in combination with heightened T-wave alternans is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause death in low-risk populations. The study, published in the December edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, reveals routine exercise testing could allow health professionals to assess cardiovascular mortality based on the measurement of heart rate recovery and T-wave alternans.

WASHINGTON, April 1, 2010 — New findings confirm atrial fibrillation (AF) is independently associated with the risk of all forms of dementia, including Alzheimer’s and other senile and vascular dementia types. According to a study published in the April edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the presence of atrial fibrillation indicated higher mortality rates in all dementia subtypes; however, mortality risk was most prominent in the youngest population studied.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – According to a sub-study of the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-CRT (MADIT-CRT), left ventricular (LV) leads positioned in the apical region when compared to the mid-ventricular or basal regions are associated with a significantly increased risk of heart failure (HF) and death in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The late-breaking clinical trial presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, is the first trial to evaluate clinical outcomes based on the LV lead position within a mildly symptomatic CRT patient population.

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) has released a first-of-its-kind expert consensus statement on three specific cardiovascular disorders that also involve the autonomic nervous system. The 2015 Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia, and Vasovagal Syncope was written by an international group of experts and presented today at Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 36th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Members of the Heart Rhythm Society visited 35 congressional offices on Capitol Hill to raise visibility and support for two proposals: the “Medicare Program Integrity Improvement and Education Act” and the “Teaching Children to Save Lives Act.” HRS is advocating for the support of these two bills because both intend to deliver outcomes aligned with the Society’s mission to improve the care of patients by advancing research, education and optimal health care policies and standards.

Yesterday, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) submitted a written testimony to the Senate Committee on Finance to share its views on Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) in the Medicare Program. HRS provided comments regarding the regulatory burden associated with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) program integrity activities that negatively impact physicians and physician group practices.

The Heart Rhythm Society announces the appointment of Peng-Sheng Chen, MD, FHRS, as the new editor-in-chief of HeartRhythm, the official journal of HRS. Effective January 2014, Dr. Chen will replace Douglas Zipes, MD, FHRS, who will have served as editor-in-chief for ten years after founding the Journal in 2004. Currently, Dr. Chen is the Professor of Medicine, Director of the Krannert Institute of Cardiology and the Division of Cardiology, and Medtronic-Zipes Chair in Cardiology at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana. Additionally, Dr. Chen is an associate editor on the HeartRhythm editorial board and has served on the Journal’s editorial board since 2005.

The Training and Credentialing Committee of the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) launched a comprehensive review of advanced electrophysiology (EP) fellowships in an effort to ensure the highest possible standards for training programs and practitioners in the field. The report, Recommendations for Advanced Fellowship Training in Clinical Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology, expands upon guidelines published in 2005 and a supplemental consensus statement issued by PACES and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) in 2008.  This new report will be featured in the May edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of HRS.

BOSTON – For the first time, a significant and direct correlation has been shown between the specific region of the body where obese individuals carry their weight and the increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD).  Specifically, obese individuals with an “apple” shape figure, or larger waste-to-hip ratio (WHR), are at greater risk than those with a more “pear” shaped figure, or smaller WHR. 

BOSTON – A study of more than 350 competitive athletes with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) from around the world showed for the first time that sports may be safer for this group than has been thought.  There were no occurrences of death or injury due to arrhythmia or shock during sports in this group.  Additionally, only ten percent of the athletes received a shock during competition or practice and of those, most continued to play, as reported today at Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions.

BOSTON – The Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) release the PACES/HRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Management of the Asymptomatic Young Patient with a Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW, Ventricular Preexcitation) Electrocardiographic Pattern.  The expert consensus statement presented today at Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions, provides first-of-its-kind clinical practice guidelines on the evaluation and management of asymptomatic young patients with a WPW electrocardiographic pattern.

BOSTON – A retrospective analysis of data from the OMNI Registry, a large-scale, longitudinal registry of nearly 3,000 heart device patients, revealed that primary prevention non-evidence-based (NEB) implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) recipients had similar therapeutic benefits and outcomes as evidence-based (EB) ICD recipients.  These findings are being presented today at Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions.

To support consumer education about heart rhythm disorders, the Heart Rhythm Society has launched a Citywide Awareness Campaign in Denver to improve knowledge about symptoms, warning signs, and available treatment options. The initiative takes place in conjuction with Heart Rhythm 2013, the Society's 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.

DENVER – Today, former United States President, Bill Clinton presents the keynote address at the Opening Plenary Session at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions and this year’s premier conference on cardiac arrhythmias. Taking place at the Colorado Convention Center, Heart Rhythm 2013 builds on years of tradition and will once again bring together the world’s most noted experts to network and explore advancements in the cardiac arrhythmia field.

WASHINGTON – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Board of Trustees today announced the launch of HRS Consulting Services, a new business entity designed to provide HRS members, affiliates, payers, and hospitals with EP-related advisory services for managing the dynamic changes and demands of today’s healthcare environment. This unique endeavor is a strategic decision by HRS in response to member feedback. It supports the Society’s ongoing mission to improve the care of patients suffering from heart rhythm disorders by promoting research, education, and optimal healthcare policies and standards. HRS Consulting Services will focus on providing expert advisory knowledge relevant for EP labs and clinics seeking to achieve maximum financial performance and operational efficiencies for delivery of cost-effective, high-quality patient care.   

Results from a six-month nationwide effort to educate African Americans about the risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) will be presented at a special session at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society's 34th Annual Scientific Sessions, on May 9, 2013, in Denver. Launched in October 2012 by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Association of Black Cardiologists (ABC), the "Arrest the Risk" campaign was designed to help reduce disparities in the treatment and prevention of SCA among African Americans by increasing the dialogue between patients and physicians.

Washington — Members of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the international leader in science, education and advocacy for cardiac arrhythmia professionals and patients, visited more than 35 congressional offices on Capitol Hill recently to raise visibility and support for a resolution promoting the awareness, diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF).

March 24, 2011 — The Heart Rhythm Society has published an editorial commentary, “ICDs: Evidence, Guidelines, and Glitches,” in HeartRhythm Journal, now available online and to be published in the May print edition. The commentary is a response to the study, “Non-Evidence-Based Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantations in the United States,” published in the January 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

SAN FRANCISCO – New research conducted in Seattle and King County, WA, found that sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is associated with a high rate of survival at both traditional and alternative exercise facilities. A study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2011, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 32nd Annual Scientific Sessions, included data from hundreds of SCA cases revealing the most common activities performed at time of SCA and overall outcomes in individuals.

SAN FRANCISCO — A new study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2011, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 32nd Annual Scientific Sessions, proves the importance of electrocardiographic (ECG) screenings to identify heart abnormalities in young adults, including both athletes and non-athletes. The study demonstrates the success of a high-volume ECG screening program designed to identify potential life-threatening heart arrhythmias in high school students. Of the more than 50,000 students screened, ECG abnormalities that may be associated with the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) were identified in over 1,000 students.

WASHINGTON — Results from a new study demonstrate a significant increase in the incidence of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) among patients with an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) compared to patients without SDB. The study, published in the May edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, found an increase in appropriate ICD therapies among SDB patients that creates a rationale for SDB screening in patients with predominant nighttime ICD therapy.

WASHINGTON — The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) applauds the introduction of House Resolution 295 on Thursday night by Representative Kay Granger (R-TX), Representative Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD) and Representative Charles Gonzalez (D-TX). The resolution will support efforts by the HRS and other stakeholders to raise public awareness of Atrial Fibrillation (AF) by enhancing the quality of care and patient safety, advancing research and education, and improving access to appropriate medical treatment for patients suffering from AF.

WASHINGTON — Results from a case control study show that coronary artery disease affecting the atrial branches is an independent predictor for new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) after acute myocardial infarction (MI), or heart attack. The study, published in the July edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, evaluated the characteristics associated with the development of new-onset AF in a cohort of consecutive patients with acute MI.

BOSTON – Today, Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions and this year’s premier conference on cardiac arrhythmias, begins at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center.  The meeting is the most comprehensive educational event on heart rhythm disorders, offering more than 250 educational opportunities, over 130 exhibits and seven specialty tracks in the heart rhythm management field.  This year’s focus of Heart Rhythm 2012 is on “Our Patients”, and showcases the latest science, discovery and innovation that are essential to improving the quality care for patients.

Leading medical specialty societies will release more than 30 new lists of specific tests or procedures they say are commonly ordered but not always necessary and could cause harm as part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, the ABIM Foundation announced. As part of the campaign, the Heart Rhythm Society will release its list in early February 2014.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research reveals that abandoning a nonfunctioning lead in an ICD patient is safe and does not pose a clinically significant risk of complication. The lead is the wire placed in the heart that transmits the heart's electrical signals to the defibrillator for interpretation. The new study published in the January edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, suggests that the practice of abandoning nonfunctioning leads does not result in additional risk to the patient and lead extraction should be reserved for cases of system infection or when large numbers of leads have been abandoned.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research proves that increased QT variability is an independent predictor of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) in men, while in women, QT variability alone does not pose a risk of arrhythmic events. The new study published in the February edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, confirms that gender does in fact play a significant role in predicting the risk of VT/VF. The study goes on to reveal that QT variability, when not correlated to heart rate variability, is a uniquely significant predictor of arrhythmic events in women.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research reveals that black and Hispanic patients who were eligible for cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) were less likely to receive therapy than eligible white patients. The study also found that both minority groups were more likely to meet established criteria and white patients were more likely to receive CRT-D outside of published guidelines. The new study published in the March edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, is the first of its kind to examine and compare Hispanic, white and black patients within a national study population.

WASHINGTON, DC — The Heart Rhythm Society applauds the introduction of House Resolution 255 which calls for a National Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Awareness Month in September. Introduced by Representative C.A. ‘”Dutch” Ruppersberger (D-MD) and co-sponsored by Kay Granger (R-TX), the resolution will support efforts to raise awareness about AF which impacts approximately 2.2 million Americans each day as well as promote prevention and advance optimal patient care.

ORLANDO, FL — The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) announce a new collaboration to deliver free, unlimited access to Cardiosource’s Arrhythmias and Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Clinical Collections containing relevant, up-to-date information for cardiology professionals.

The article “Association of Physician Certification and Outcomes Among Patients Receiving an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator” was published in the April 22nd issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). In response to this article, the Heart Rhythm Society would like to reiterate its position on the positive correlation between electrophysiology certification and improved outcomes following ICD implantation.

WASHINGTON, DC — A study published in the May edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, found that many non-prescription weight-loss supplements that are accessible online may have hidden heart health risks. Eight out of 12 weight-loss supplements analyzed contained one or more ingredients associated with life-threatening cardiac complications such as ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death.

BOSTON, May 13, 2009 – Electrocardiography (EKG)-based screenings among elite collegiate athletes find potentially important pathology that is not detected by history and physical examinations alone, according to a new study released today at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Sessions. This is the first study to evaluate the costs and yield of routine EKG screenings in a large group of high-level performing college athletes.

BOSTON, May 13, 2009 — Safe and effective management of patients with cardiovascular implantable devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is a complex and evolving issue. To ensure that physicians and facilities are adequately prepared to determine if and when lead extraction is necessary and to give patients the best possible care during these procedures, the Heart Rhythm Society has developed Transvenous Lead Extraction: Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on Facilities, Training, Indications and Patient Management.The consensus statement was released today at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Sessions.

BOSTON, May 13, 2009 — Despite a higher prevalence of risk factors for atrial fibrillation (AF), African Americans have a markedly lower prevalence of AF compared to Caucasians. The new study presented at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Sessions, is the largest of its kind to prove that race has a direct impact on the occurrence of AF, most notably when comparing African Americans to Caucasians.

BOSTON, May 14, 2009 — Catheter ablation is now an important therapy option to be considered when trying to control recurrent ventricular tachycardias (VT). To ensure that physicians have up to date knowledge of this evolving therapy, which can be life-saving for some patients, and promote the best patient care, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Rhythm Society have prepared EHRA/HRS Expert Consensus on Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Arrhythmias. The consensus statement was released today at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Sessions.

A largest-of-its kind study has found that women who experience menopause at a younger age are at a decreased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). The study followed nearly 18,000 women and revealed that women experiencing menopause younger than 44 years had a significantly lower risk of AF than women entering menopause between the ages of 44-50. The research was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 36th Annual Scientific Sessions.

The first study to examine the safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (botox) injections into epicardial fat pads during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery found that the approach not only reduces the incidence of post-operative atrial fibrillation (AF), but also provides substantial AF suppression after one year. The results showing the benefit of botox injections after cardiac surgery were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 36th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Misconceptions about atrial fibrillation (AF) are common among people nationwide, according to a new survey by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). More than half (56 percent) of Americans do not know that AF puts someone at a high risk of having a stroke. People are more likely to assume high risk related to other common factors like smoking, eating fried or fatty foods or drinking a lot of alcohol. HRS and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) call on Columbus residents to learn the truth about AF and encourage those who suffer from the disorder to talk to their doctors about their increased risk for stroke.

SAN FRANCISCO — A new subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) system accurately detected and successfully converted all episodes of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in all observed patients. According to a study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2011, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 32nd Annual Scientific Sessions, the S-ICD system was 100 percent effective in converting induced VF through appropriate shock. Sudden death did not occur in any patients.

SAN FRANCISCO — The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) issues the first consensus statement for the perioperative management of patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The HRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Perioperative Management of Patients with Implantable Defibrillators, Pacemakers and Arrhythmia Monitors: Facilities and Patient Management was developed as a joint project with the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), and in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS).

SAN FRANCISCO — Results of a large multi-center experience found a ventricular effective refractory period of <200 ms and QRS fragmentation to be significant and independent predictors of arrhythmias in Brugada syndrome. The PRELUDE registry, a late-breaking clinical trial presented today at Heart Rhythm 2011, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 32nd Annual Scientific Sessions, adopted for the first time a standardized programmed electrical stimulation protocol to test ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) inducibility accuracy, and other predictors of cardiac events in a prospective fashion.

SAN FRANCISCO — The CONFIRM study (Conventional Ablation with or without FIRM (Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation)) demonstrated that, by using a novel diagnostic mapping system, atrial fibrillation (AF) was acutely terminated or substantially slowed with less than 10 minutes of ablation per identified source. FIRM ablation also resulted in a 70 percent increase in the two year freedom from AF (from 50 percent with standard-of-care ablation to 84 percent when preceded by FIRM).

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) convened the Relationships with Industry Task Force on October 18, 2010, to consider the importance of collaborating with industry and to establish guidelines to avoid conflicts or potential misunderstandings. The Task Force compiled an industry guidance document for HRS and its members, which will be presented on May 5, 2011, at Heart Rhythm 2011, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 32nd Annual Scientific Sessions.

SAN FRANCISCO – Genetic testing is increasingly important in determining potential cardiac conditions in patients and is used in clinical settings more than ever before. To ensure that physicians have up-to-date knowledge of the evolving role of genetic testing for sudden death predisposing, genetic heart diseases in cardiology, which can be life-saving for some patients, the Heart Rhythm Society and the European Heart Rhythm Association have prepared HRS/EHRA Expert Consensus Statement on the State of Genetic Testing for the Channelopathies and Cardiomyopathies.

WASHINGTON — Results from a large, United States based cohort study show that current smokers double their risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to people who have never smoked, after more than 13 years of follow-up. The study, published in the August edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, indicates a trend towards significantly lower risk of developing AF for those who quit smoking cigarettes versus those who continue to smoke.

WASHINGTON — Does it feel like a fish flopping, thunder rumbling or drums pounding in your chest?  If so, you may be suffering from a serious heart condition called Atrial Fibrillation (AF).  To help potential AF sufferers make that connection, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) is kicking off AF Awareness Month with the “A-Fib Feels Like” campaign. 

WASHINGTON — A new study proves the importance of electrocardiographic (ECG) screenings to identify heart abnormalities in young adults, including both athletes and non-athletes.  The study, published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, demonstrates the success of a high-volume ECG screening program designed to identify potential life-threatening heart arrhythmias in high school students.  Of the more than 32,000 students screened, ECG abnormalities that may be associated with the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) were identified in over 800 students.

WASHINGTON — New study results reveal underlying causes of nonischemic sudden cardiac death (SCD) – those causes not related to coronary artery disease (CAD) – including alcohol, obesity and myocardial fibrosis.  The study, published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, also reinforces CAD as one of the most prevalent causes of SCD in the general population.  Furthermore, the results establish specific causes of nonischemic SCD in different age groups, including people under the age of 40.

WASHINGTON, November 3, 2011 — New study indicates strong diagnostic ability of treadmill exercise stress testing to uncover Long QT syndrome (LQTS) in patients. In the study, investigators from the Mayo Clinic show how the recovery phase displays significant and maladaptive changes in the QTc unveiling the most common LQTS type, LQT1. The study, published in the November edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, is the largest, single-center study of treadmill exercise stress testing in patients with genetically proven LQTS, as well as those who were dismissed as normal.

WASHINGTON, October 18, 2011 — In recognition of National Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month, the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Coalition (SCAC), in cooperation with the Congressional Heart and Stroke Caucus, is hosting "Take a Stand Against Sudden Cardiac Arrest," a two-hour event that will teach the basics of Hands-Only CPR and use of AEDs (automated external defibrillators) on Wednesday, October 26, from 4:00pm-6:00pm in the Rayburn House Office Building Foyer.

WASHINGTON — New study shows significant increase in quality of life (QoL) among overweight patients following ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), compared to patients with a lower body mass index (BMI) where no substantial improvement was observed.  The study, published in the December edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, reveals an association between BMI and a change in QoL between the pre- and postablation periods in a large AF patient cohort.  The study also verifies comparable procedural success rates of ablation in both overweight and lean patients.

WASHINGTON — According to a new survey issued by the Heart Rhythm Society, the majority of Americans are unaware of two serious and potentially life-threatening heart rhythm disorders, atrial fibrillation (AF) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). In fact, only one in three Americans have ever heard of AF or recognize the number of lives claimed each year from SCA. Throughout February, Heart Health Month, the Heart Rhythm Society spotlights the need for public education on heart rhythm disorders affecting millions of people, and the specialists best suited to treat them – electrophysiologists.

WASHINGTON —  The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), written in joint partnership with European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society (ECAS), issues an international consensus statement on indications, techniques and outcomes of catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF).

WASHINGTON — The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) has awarded Accreditation with Commendation—its highest level of accreditation—to the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) for its continuing medical education (CME) programs. Under the updated 2006 Accreditation Criteria, approximately 21% of the providers reviewed to date have been awarded Accreditation with Commendation.

WASHINGTON —  Black patients with high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, have a twofold risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) regardless of other common risk factors such as age, gender, family history and pre-existing heart disease, according to the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction (LIFE) in Hypertension study. The LIFE study, published in the April edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, is the first study to show a direct correlation between race and the risk of SCD in hypertensive patients after adjusting for multiple factors.

BOSTON – Initial results from the International Evaluation oF FactORs ImpacTing CLinical Outcome and Cost EffectiveneSS (EFFORTLESS) subcutaneous implantable defibrillator (S-ICD System) Registry shows that the latest heart device, the S-ICD System, is performing appropriately in real-world circumstances and continues to show positive results in patients.  Data analyzed from the largest study of real world experience using the S-ICD System to-date, demonstrated a conversion rate >98% for induced and ambulatory ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), consistent with transvenous ICD systems. 

BOSTON – A study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions, reports that Black Africans are 50 percent less likely to develop atrial fibrillation (AF) than White Europeans, despite greater prevalence of risk factors, such as heart failure, diabetes, prior stroke and left ventricular hypertrophy.  For the first time, this analysis of a large population of patients with an implanted dual-chamber pacemaker shows that genetic and/or environmental factors affect the incidence of AF.

BOSTON – Results from a randomized clinical trial of 127 patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) from around the world show that pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) with radiofrequency ablation is safe and significantly superior to the current first-line therapy approach of antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD), as reported today from Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions.

WASHINGTON, May 14, 2012 – Anne M. Gillis, MD, FHRS, was named the president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) during the 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions, held in Boston last week. Announced during the Presidents’ Reception on Friday, May 11th, Dr. Gillis now serves as the 34th president of HRS and the second international president preceded by Bernard S. Goldman, MD (1982-1983).

Washington, DC, June 28, 2012 – The Alliance of Specialty Medicine released the following statement in reaction to today's ruling by the United States Supreme Court:

“While we certainly respect the Supreme Court’s decision, we will not be deterred from working to reform or repeal certain aspects of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that are onerous to the practice of medicine and are detrimental to patients’ access to quality care.

Washington – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the international leader in science, education and advocacy for cardiac arrhythmia professionals and patients, has been named a Bronze winner in the “Health & Wellness” category of the 33rd Annual Telly Awards for its Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Patient Education DVD. HRS was selected among great competition as this year’s Annual Telly Awards received over 12,000 entries from all 50 states and five continents.

DENVER– New research presented at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions, continues to show promising results for Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation (FIRM) guided ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The novel diagnostic real-time mapping system helps target ablation therapy to patient-specific drivers of AF rather than to anatomical targets, which can improve patient outcomes.

DENVER – Social media may hold the key to improving outcomes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) emergencies, which claim more than 350,000 lives in the United States (U.S.) each year. A new initiative to build a geolocated automated external defibrillator (AED) database through crowdsourcing may be a low cost, high impact concept to help the public find an AED in an emergency. Findings from the pilot study were revealed today at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.

DENVER – While certain well-known health conditions including obesity, high blood pressure and cholesterol are often linked to heart disease, a new study is the first to show a connection between sex hormones and the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). The findings could help improve clinical predictors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in both men and women and were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.

DENVER – Wearable cardioverter defibrillators (WCD) can be an effective therapy option for patients with a transient or undefined arrhythmic risk, according to the WEARIT-II Registry, the largest prospective study to track patients with the device in a real world setting. The new findings show that WCDs can serve as a bridging therapy and help avoid unnecessary permanent implantation of defibrillators in patients who ultimately may not need them. Findings were released today at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.

A new study shows catheter ablation, a common procedure used to treat heart rhythm disorders, may reduce stroke risk for those with atrial fibrillation (AF) – the most common arrhythmia. The multicenter study, published in the September edition of HeartRhythm,the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), is the first to show AF ablation patients have significantly lower risk of stroke compared to AF patients who do not undergo ablation regardless of stroke risk profile.

During February Heart Health Month, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Association of Black Cardiologists (ABC) are urging consumers, particularly African Americans, to "Arrest The Risk." Responsible for more than 350,000 U.S. deaths each year, sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) occurs when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. Approximately 95 percent of SCA cases result in death; however, it is proven most deadly in African Americans. To help reduce the incidence of SCA among African Americans, HRS and ABC are announcing a 10-city initiative to educate at-risk communities and provide resources regarding risk factors and recommended treatments to prevent SCA.

The first-in-human trial of a new miniaturized leadless pacemaker implanted directly inside the heart found that the transcatheter pacing system (TPS) can be safely and effectively applied in patients with a slow heart rhythm. Early performance results from the international Micra™ Transcatheter Pacing Study were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 36th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Nearly four million Americans suffer from arrhythmias each year[i] . Arrhythmias or heart rhythm disorders affect the electrical system of the heart and often cause an irregular pulse. During Heart Health Month this February, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) is calling on all Americans to take action to prevent and treat heart rhythm disorders such as atrial fibrillation (AF), which can lead to more serious health issues such as sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) today released its list of specific treatments and procedures related to heart rhythm disorders that are not always necessary. HRS developed the list as part of Choosing Wisely®, an initiative of the ABIM Foundation launched in 2012 aimed at curbing the use of certain tests and procedures that are not supported by clinical research.

A new survey of more than 1,200 physicians, patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) and their caregivers uncovered important information gaps regarding the impact of AFib-related stroke, including communication barriers, challenges with patient education, misperceptions about treatment compliance, and outcomes related to the impact of stroke on one’s life. The survey was issued by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and National Stroke Association in collaboration with Boehringer Ingelheim (BI), and the findings were presented today during a special session at the American Heart Association’s annual Scientific Sessions in Chicago.

A new study evaluating Optim-insulated implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads found low rates of all-cause mechanical failure during a median follow-up of 3.2 years. The long-term prospective study, published in the December edition of HeartRhythm,the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, is the first-of-its-kind to observe a large population of patients over a relatively long follow-up period. The study assessed Durata DF4, Durata DF1 and Riata ST Optim leads to determine the rates of all-cause mechanical failure and its subtypes, including conductor fracture, insulation abrasion and externalized conductors.

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), through its efforts during Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month in September and throughout the year, is working to raise awareness of the increased prevalence of the disease and the associated risk of stroke in patients living with atrial fibrillation (AFib).

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and the Socieded Latinoamericana de Estimulacion Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia (SOLAECE) release the 2015 HRS/EHRA/APHRS/SOLAECE Expert Consensus Statement on Optimal Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Programming and Testing. 

Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s (HRS) 37th Annual Scientific Sessions and this year’s leading conference on cardiac arrhythmias, commences at the Moscone Center. The meeting focuses on the importance of collaboration to propel the field of cardiac pacing and electrophysiology (EP) forward. HRS is the only organization that brings together the world’s leading clinicians, scientists and allied health professionals to help end death and suffering from heart rhythm disorders.

A new study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 37th Annual Scientific Sessions, found that among patients with heart failure, atrial fibrillation (AF) was significantly less common among African Americans and Hispanics than among non-Hispanic Whites. This study indicates a strong correlation between race and ethnicity and the development of AF for patients with heart failure. 

Results from a first-of-its-kind study identify a significant increase in the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) among patients with pacemaker-detected sleep apnea. The study, presented today at Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 37th Annual Scientific Sessions, suggests that monitoring for sleep apnea in patients with pacemakers is imperative in identifying patients’ risk for developing AF. 

The first ever trial using new SonR hemodynamic sensor technology proves to be safely and effectively applied in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) patients. Early performance results from the Clinical Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy with the SonR Hemodynamic Sensor: The RESPOND-CRT Randomized Trial were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 37th Annual Scientific Sessions and show reduction in hospitalizations for this patient population by 35 percent. 

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), in partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced today that Mark H. Eckman, MD, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, and Steven A. Lubitz, MD, MPH, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, were awarded the Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Quality Improvement (QI) Innovation Grant. The grant support will help innovation and advancement in atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention through research aimed at addressing National QI priorities. Dr. Eckman won for his proposal on Shared Decision-Making Tool for Thromboprophylaxis in Atrial Fibrillation and Dr. Lubitz won for his proposal on Automated Physician Notifications to Improve Guideline-Based Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation. They presented to an expert panel during Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 37th Annual Scientific Sessions.

The mid to long-term results from the EFFORTLESS study, the largest subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) registry in the world, show the device provides reliable treatment for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. This is the first report on the fully enrolled EFFORTLESS cohort and includes real-world outcomes of almost 1,000 patients implanted with an S-ICD. Positive results showing longevity during three- and up to five-year follow-ups were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 37th Annual Scientific Sessions.

A new, large study shows that 95.7 percent of individual leads were successfully removed using a procedure called transvenous lead extraction (TLE). The ELECTRa (European Lead Extraction ContTRolled) Registry, hosted by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), is the first multinational, multi-center, prospective registry of consecutive patients undergoing TLE. The research was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 37th Annual Scientific Sessions, and includes data from both high volume and low volume medical centers.

A new study shows the use of novel anticoagulants (such as rivoraxiban, apixiban and dabigatran) to treat atrial fibrillation (AF) on an “as needed basis” guided by diligent pulse monitoring can be an effective and safe way to lower overall risk of stroke. The study includes motivated patients that were eager to seek an alternative to long-term, daily oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) after ablation or drug therapy. The research was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 37th Annual Scientific Sessions.

A new study has found an increased risk of dementia in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) that receive long-term, blood thinner, warfarin (Coumadin) compared to patients that use warfarin for conditions other than AF. The study of more than 10,000 patients treated with warfarin long-term found that patients with AF experience higher rates of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia compared to anticoagulated non-AF patients. The research was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2016, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 37th Annual Scientific Sessions.

ContextMedia:Health, the leading provider of digital solutions at the point of care, today announced the launch of a content development partnership with the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the country's leading resource on heart rhythm disorders. The partnership will bring content from the HRS educational library to patients in ContextMedia:Health's network of 25,000 practices by way of ContextMedia:Health's suite of digital waiting room and exam room platforms.

Today, Heart Rhythm 2017, the Heart Rhythm Society’s (HRS) 38th Annual Scientific Sessions, kicks off at McCormick Place in Chicago where leading clinicians, scientists, researchers, educators and innovators from around the world present and discuss groundbreaking research for the care of cardiac arrhythmias. The theme of this year’s meeting is “Together We Can” to reinforce the importance of global collaboration to propel the field of electrophysiology (EP) forward. 

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) released a first-of-its-kind consensus statement in the United States on indications of patients who undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiation exposure with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The expert writing group presented the recommendations included in the 2017 HRS Expert Consensus Statement on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Radiation Exposure in Patients with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices today at Heart Rhythm 2017, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 38th Annual Scientific Sessions.  

A new study shows that the use of a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) is safe and effective in treating ventricular arrhythmias for pediatric patients who are at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). The study represents the largest pediatric patient population to date when evaluating the WCD as a therapy option. The findings of the study were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2017, the Heart Rhythm’s 38th Annual Scientific Sessions.

A new study shows that the Apple Watch's heart rate sensor, when paired with an artificial intelligence-based algorithm, can detect a serious and often symptomless heart arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation (AF). The new research uses a deep neural network based on photoplethysmographic (PPG) sensors commonly found in smart watches. The results of this study were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2017, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 38th Annual Scientific Sessions.

New study proves safety of novel, wireless pacing system, WiSE-CRT (Wireless Stimulation Endocardially for cardiac resynchronization therapy) two years after implantation. The study is the first to report on the medium-long term feasibility of the leadless pacing system for heart failure patients and was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2017, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 38th Annual Scientific Sessions.

A new study found that dementia rates increase with delays in starting anticoagulation treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF). The large study included more than 76,230 AF patients with no prior history of dementia that were treated with an antiplatelet or warfarin. The results were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2017, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 38th Annual Scientific Sessions, and show that warfarin, in particular, can increase the risk of dementia long-term. 

Today, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) in joint partnership with the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society (ECAS), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLAECE) issued an international consensus statement that provides a state-of-the-art review of the indications, techniques, and outcomes of catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). The 2017 HRS/EHRA/ECAS/APHRS/SOLAECE Expert Consensus Statement on Catheter and Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation, first issued in 2007, and again in 2012, represents a state-of-the art review of the field of catheter and surgical ablation of AF. This document is a complete and comprehensive revision of the 2012 statement and was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2017, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 38th Annual Scientific Sessions.  

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) issued an international consensus statement that comprehensively addresses lead management for patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The 2017 HRS Expert Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Device Lead Management and Extraction was presented today at the 10th Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) Annual Scientific Session held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Heart Rhythm Society (JHRS). The expert consensus statement is the first to have a comprehensive discussion of lead management issues, including lead extraction, and is an update to the 2009 HRS lead extraction clinical document.   

WASHINGTON, DC – The American College of Cardiology (ACC), Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) have announced a partnership to develop new modules to help subspecialty cardiologists potentially meet collaborative maintenance pathway requirements equivalent to satisfying the ABIM’s current 10-year MOC examination.

Working in concert, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the Alliance of Cardiovascular Professionals (ACVP) and the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) announce the release of the IAC Cardiovascular Catheterization accreditation program. Representatives from these organizations, as well as pediatric cardiologist and nurse members-at-large, have developed standards and created the accreditation process. The program establishes quality metrics and provides a rigorous evaluation through clinical peer review of the facility’s processes, documentation, and imaging critical to quality patient care as it relates to cardiovascular catheterization procedures.