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 BOSTON – New research reports significant differences between men and women with atrial fibrillation (AF) and the safety of intense physical activity. The study found that both moderate and vigorous levels of exercise are safe for women living with AF. However, vigorous levels of exercise are associated with an increased risk of AF in men. The research, analyzing data from a large-scale or robust patient population of nearly 380,000 patients, was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 36th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Today, Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s (HRS) 36th Annual Scientific Sessions and this year’s leading conference on cardiac arrhythmias commences at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. This year’s meeting will focus on the power of interactivity – how networks, both technological and personal, are connecting to propel the science, discovery, and innovation of the electrophysiology (EP) field.

Dr. Tyler W. Barrett obtained his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor followed by his doctorate at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He completed an Emergency Medicine residency and chief resident year at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2005. Dr. Barrett then joined the faculty at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

On February 11, 2015, cardiac arrhythmia health care professionals around the world will celebrate and be recognized for their unique knowledge and skillset during International Board of Heart Rhythm Examiners (IBHRE®) Day. IBHRE Day encourages employers to extend their appreciation to their IBHRE certified employees and offers a platform for the certified professionals to educate the public about their credentials.

For the first time, the relationship between remote monitoring and pacemaker patient survival outcomes is revealed in a study released today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions. The study shows that the utilization of remote monitoring can improve survival outcomes in patients with pacemakers. Furthermore, survival rates improved in patients with the highest engagement rates in remote monitoring, regardless of device type.

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) released Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy in Patients Who Are Not Included or Not Well Represented in Clinical Trials today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions. The expert consensus statement provides first-of-its-kind guidance on ICD therapy for the management of patient populations who are not well represented in clinical trials and, as a result, not specifically included in existing guidelines. View the consensus statement.

A study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions, reports significant gender and health insurance disparities in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) procedures. For the first time in nearly a decade, the new analysis of ICD implants in the United States shows a majority of implants are performed on people with insurance and more commonly in the male population.

Today, Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s (HRS) 35th Annual Scientific Sessions and this year’s premier conference on cardiac arrhythmias begins at the Moscone Center. Heart Rhythm 2014 takes a profound look into the advancement of medical technology while once again creating a global exchange of ideas and best practices in order to promote optimal patient care worldwide.

A new study has found that adding an electrocardiogram (ECG) to existing pre-participation screening of high school athletes increases the likelihood of identifying disorders associated with sudden cardiac death. By using modern interpretation criteria, screenings resulted in fewer false-positive rates, which leads to more accurate detection. The new findings were presented today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions.

New research has found that bariatric surgery is an effective way to control weight in morbidly obese patients who are at risk for developing atrial fibrillation (AF). Bariatric or weight loss surgery is an operation on the stomach that limits food intake and is typically recommended for patients who are unable to lose weight on their own through diet and exercise. The first study of its kind to look at the relationship between AF and bariatric surgery on a large patient population was presented today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions. View the full study.

A first of its kind randomized trial has found that defibrillator testing (DT) at the time of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is safe, but does not improve clinical shock efficacy or  prevent death. The findings are part of the Shockless Implant Evaluation (SIMPLE) trial, which was designed to answer whether or not routine DT at time of implant actually improves patient outcomes. The results were released today at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 35th Annual Scientific Sessions.

The Heart Rhythm Society's Annual Board Review Course is the preferred resource for physicians seeking a comprehensive review of content focused on preparation for the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification and recertification examinations in Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology. The course is led by internationally recognized faculty members and offers attendees a chance to review the essential exam areas described in the ABIM blueprint in both didactic and case-based forms. For those not preparing for the exam, the course provides an excellent update and overview of cardiac electrophysiology.

Misconceptions about atrial fibrillation (AF) are common among people nationwide, according to a recent survey by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). More than half (56 percent) of Americans do not know that AF puts someone at a high risk of having a stroke. People are more likely to assume high risk related to other common factors like smoking, eating fried or fatty foods or drinking a lot of alcohol. HRS calls on San Diego residents to learn the truth about AF and encourages those who suffer from the disorder to talk to their doctors about their increased risk for stroke.

A new study shows how specific factors such as gender, age and mood disorders like anxiety and depression can lead patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) to inaccurately assess their heart rhythm. The study, published in the April edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), is the first-of-its-kind to evaluate demographics, health status and heart monitor data to identify specific factors that predict inaccuracies. Patients with persistent AF, women, older adults and those diagnosed with anxiety or depression were most likely to have inaccurate perceptions by either over-or-underestimating their AF symptoms.

Two standards in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (which is mostly applicable to for profit corporations), cover non-profit corporations: document destruction and whistle-blower protection. The Heart Rhythm Society's Board of Trustees approved the below Whistle-Blower/Code of Conduct Policy in June 2009.

History

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In 1979, four electrophysiologists recognized the need for a society dedicated to the field cardiac pacing and electrophysiology. Doctors J. Warren Harthorne, Victor Parsonnet, Seymour Furman, and Dryden Morse thus founded the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology, or NASPE, in Boston. In 2004, NASPE celebrated its 25th anniversary, moved to Washington, DC and changes its name to Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) to better reflect its membership constituencies and expanded mission. 

 

This free 30 minute presentation will cover the spectrum of rhythm control strategies with focused topics, including the recent update to the AF Guidelines, pharmacological treatment options, and the latest thinking on rate vs. rhythm control. A case-based format will be utilized to demonstrate clinical decision pathways and the pros and cons of various therapeutic options, including FDA-approved antiarrhythmic agents.

WASHINGTON, DC — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with major implantable pacemaker and ICD manufacturers, demonstrated the effects of emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) readers on common implantable cardiac devices. According to research published in the January edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the observed effects may cause increasing complications as RFID use expands in the medical device field.

WASHINGTON, DC — New multicenter research reveals that female patients fail ablation procedures more often than male patients, according to a study published in the February edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heat Rhythm Society. The study also shows that males undergo catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation five times as often as females and typically with significantly fewer complications.

The expert faculty present multiple cases to support their management advice and invite registrants to participate in the Live Questions and Answers session on Tuesday, June 11, 2013 from 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. ET.  We anticipate this innovative and interactive learning format will be a valuable educational tool for the electrophysiology community.

WASHINGTON, DC — March 1, 2010 – Analysis of ICD patients enrolled in four different trials found patients with life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias (VA) treated only with antitachycardia pacing (ATP) have higher survival rates than VA patients who experienced at least one shock-treated episode. According to research published in the March edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, 80.2% of VA episodes were successfully treated with ATP-only therapy from an ICD.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – A new study based on a large cohort of patients proves strategic programming of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices (CRT-D) reduces shocks. The results are part of a shock reduction late-breaking clinical trial presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions. According to the trial, strategic programming results in overall shock reduction between 17 and 28 percent depending on the programming of specific variables.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – According to a new study released today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, remote monitoring proves effective for earlier detection of arrhythmic events and pacemaker dysfunction in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The study is the first to consider using remote monitoring on elderly patients to detect and treat AF compared to standard follow-up procedures.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – Common herbal and nonherbal supplements, such as garlic, ginkgo and essential fatty acids, contribute to an increased risk of health complications in patients treated with warfarin. According to a new study released today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, eight out of the top ten supplements commonly taken by American consumers have been reported to impact the effectiveness of warfarin and overall safety of the individual.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – African Americans have a significantly lower incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to Caucasians despite a higher prevalence of risk factors for this specific type of arrhythmia. According to a new study presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, Caucasians are 60 percent more likely than African Americans to develop AF following heart surgery.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – According to a sub-study of the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-CRT (MADIT-CRT), females receive a clinically significant benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy devices (CRT-D) compared to men. New research presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, indicates that CRT-D therapy reduces all-cause mortality and heart failure (HF) and death end point in females, but not in males.

DENVER, May 14, 2010 – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) has released the first consensus statement for the management of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices in patients nearing end of life or requesting device deactivation. The HRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Management of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) in patients nearing end of life or requesting withdrawal of therapy was written in collaboration with representatives from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM), the American Heart Association (AHA) and the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA). 

WASHINGTON, June 1, 2010 — New study findings prove continuing warfarin therapy during pacemaker or defibrillator implantation in patients with moderate to high thromboembolic risk is safe and cost-effective. According to research published in the June edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, cessation of warfarin with bridging anticoagulation resulted in a higher incidence of bleeding complications and a longer hospital stay.  In addition, patients with temporarily interrupted anticoagulation suffered from a higher risk of transient ischemic attacks (TIA) than those who continued warfarin therapy.

WASHINGTON, July 1, 2010 — New large meta-analysis from five primary prevention randomized implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) studies shows a smaller impact of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) on overall mortality in women.  According to research published in the July edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, women in primary prevention ICD trials have the same overall mortality as men, while experiencing significantly less appropriate ICD interventions. With more than 1,600 women, this meta-analysis includes the largest cohort of women to date.  

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2010 — Released today, a new study on overall workforce trends in the field of cardiac electrophysiology (EP) reveals an increasing demand for EP professionals as a result of shifting demographic trends, evolving health reform policies and improved procedural outcomes. The comprehensive workforce study published in the September issue of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, found substantial growth in the overall volume and complexity of cardiac procedures performed in the past decade.

WASHINGTON, September 1, 2010 — New research released today is the first to find both anatomical and procedural considerations that can lead to the creation of esophageal ulcerations (ESUL) after radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). According to a study published in the September issue of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, patients at high-risk for esophageal injury can be identified based on pre-acquired multislice computed tomography. The study is the largest to provide serial endoscopy data on the esophagus after radiofrequency ablation.

WASHINGTON, DC, September 8, 2010 — The National ICD Registry, a repository of ICD implantation data developed through a partnership of the Heart Rhythm Society and the American College of Cardiology Foundation, has released the National ICD Registry Annual Report 2009. This is the fourth annual review of the Registry and is published in the September edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society.

WASHINGTON, DC, September 21, 2010 — Six cardiovascular societies from around the world today published a statement on live case demonstrations at cardiovascular meetings. The statement is the result of a collaborative effort by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), American College of Cardiology (ACC), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), European Society of Cardiology (ESC), Sociedad Latinoamericana de Cardiología Intervencionista (SOLACI) and Asian-Pacific Society of Interventional Cardiology (APSIC). The document outlines first-of-its-kind standards for institutions and medical practitioners to consider when performing and broadcasting live cardiovascular case demonstrations at medical meetings. The document is published in the HeartRhythm Journal, Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, and Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

WASHINGTON, DC, October 1, 2010 — New research suggests that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption may aid in the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in women. According to research published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, intake of up to one drink per day was associated with lower risk of SCD. The study is the first and largest to prospectively explore the role of alcohol consumption on risk of SCD in a female population and investigate how the risk compares to other forms of coronary heart disease (CHD).

WASHINGTON, October 5, 2010 — In a powerful demonstration of collective standing in the healthcare community, more than 40 organizations gathered on Capitol Hill to issue a call to action in reducing sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) deaths. A briefing was organized by the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Coalition (SCAC) and held at the Rayburn House Office Building on the 50th anniversary of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). October is National Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month.

WASHINGTON — The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the international leader in science, education and advocacy for heart rhythm professionals and patients, recently hosted its inaugural two-day research forum to identify opportunities and challenges to advancing research in the United States and abroad in electrophysiology (EP).

WASHINGTON, October 5, 2010 — New research reveals that patients with type 2 diabetes are at a higher risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) after myocardial infraction (MI) than nondiabetic patients. According to research published in the October edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, incidence of SCD in diabetic patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction >35% is equal to that of nondiabetic patients with left ventricular ejection fraction of <35%. A secondary analysis indicated that non-sudden cardiac deaths were also higher among diabetics after a heart attack.

In response to the study, Non-Evidence-Based Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Implantations in the United States, published in the January 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) reiterate the importance of research and measurement tools designed to improve patient care. The message and teachings of this important study indicate that substantial variations exist among hospital ICD implantation strategies.

WASHINGTON, November 9, 2010 — According to a new survey, physicians were significantly less comfortable discussing withdrawal of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy compared with other life-sustaining therapies, with approximately half stating that they were not comfortable having these conversations with patients. Similarly, physicians were almost twice as likely to have been involved in withdrawal of therapies such as mechanical ventilation and hemodialysis compared with cardiac devices. The survey, published in the November edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, uncovers a need for more education regarding the legal and ethical parameters guiding cessation of PM and ICD therapy. 

WASHINGTON — Results from a large, worldwide, clinical trial show evidence that a first-of-its-kind pacemaker system is safe and effective to use during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During the trial, no MRI-related complications were reported in patients with the pacemaker system before, during, or after an MRI examination.

WASHINGTON — The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) is aware of the ongoing Department of Justice (DOJ) civil investigation of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) implants and has agreed to assist in an advisory role to lend expertise concerning proper guidelines for clinical decision making. HRS is reviewing information that does not include either identifiable patient or facility level data.

WASHINGTON, December 8, 2010 — The outcome of a recent expert consensus workshop, "NHLBI/HRS Workshop on Prediction and Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death," identifies knowledge gaps and offers six specific research recommendations in high priority areas for sudden cardiac death (SCD) prediction and prevention. In the  In the United States, SCD continues to claim more than 250,000 lives annually and is the cause of half of all heart disease deaths. The special report, Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) Prediction and Prevention: Report from a National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Heart Rhythm Society Workshop, was published in the November 30th issue of Circulation, an official journal of the American Heart Association. 

WASHINGTON, December 13, 2010 – The Heart Rhythm Society, the international leader in science, education and advocacy for heart rhythm professionals and patients, has received notification that the Society’s request for a physician specialty code for cardiac electrophysiology has been approved by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS).

The vision of the 2013 Women's Career and Leadership Development Conference for Women Cardiologists and Cardiothoracic Surgeons is to diversify the cardiology and cardiothoracic field by creating a vibrant community of women cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons that will strengthen their non-clinical professional skills, provide opportunities to enhance their professional standing, and encourage them to assume leadership positions in the field and within the American College of Cardiology.

The Symposium will focus broadly on emerging technology and therapies to include all phases of the innovation process, (e.g., ongoing or recently completed studies on devices, ablation, and mapping). The program addresses hot topics on basic, pediatric and adult electrophysiology, including multidisciplinary approaches in treatment of AF, HF, and prevention of SCD. Courses on CRT, AF ablation and ECG workshop are included in the program. The program, abstracts and registration information are available on the Symposium website .

This is the 8th year for the International Symposium on Ventricular Arrhythmias: Pathophysiology and Therapy. Using a combination of didactic presentations, panel discussions, and questions and answer sessions, our goal is to educate the participants on state-of-the-art information pertaining to the pathophysiology and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias. There will also be VT related cases streamed live from the University of Pennsylvania during which a moderated panel discussion and question and answer session will occur to educate and demonstrate to the audience members the most up to date techniques for complex ablation and other procedures.

A new study shows that atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of dementia in older adults who have not had a stroke and have normal baseline cognitive function. The meta-analysis, published in the November edition of HeartRhythm,the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, is the first-of-its-kind to observe a large population of patients over a relatively long follow-up period. The study results support an independent longitudinal relationship between the two conditions, therefore associating the presence of AF with greater risk of developing dementia. 

A new Canadian study shows that operating without interrupting warfarin treatment at the time of cardiac device surgery is safe and markedly reduces the incidence of clinically significant hematomas compared to the current standard of care.  The new findings were released today at Heart Rhythm 2013,the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), release the HRS/EHRA/APHRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Inherited Primary Arrhythmia Syndromes. The expert consensus statement presented today at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions, provides the first comprehensive statement of recommendations on the proper diagnosis and management of patients with inherited primary arrhythmia syndromes.

Hugh Calkins, MD, FHRS, CCDS, was named the president of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) during the 34th Annual Scientific Sessions, held in Denver last week.  Announced during the Presidents’ Reception on Friday, May 10th, Dr. Calkins now serves as the 35th president of HRS, making Anne M. Gillis, MD, FHRS, the immediate past president. Dr. Calkins is currently a Nicholas J. Fortuin Professor of Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at the Johns Hopkins University of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland.

The National ICD Registry®, a repository of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation data developed through a partnership of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), released the National ICD Registry Report: Version 2.1. The new version expands upon the 2009 Annual Report to now include data on leads and pediatric implants to reflect recent advancements in healthcare. This report is featured online in HeartRhythm, the official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society.

As an Employer of Choice, The Heart Rhythm Society offers a robust benefit package., We are proud of our benefit offerings and believe they provide a substantial measure of security, protection and flexibility for our staff and their families, both now and in the future.

A new study shows young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) also living with an implantable cardioverter- defibrillator (ICD) experience a high level of shock-related anxiety. The multicenter study, published in the June edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, is the first to discover that shock-related anxiety is associated with sexual dysfunction in young adults and calls on healthcare providers to address these issues to improve the quality of life for patients.

BOSTON, May 14, 2009 — Common psychotropic medications such as antipsychotics, antidepressants and benzodiazepines, may contribute to an increased risk of sudden death during an acute coronary event, according to a new study released today at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Sessions. This case-control study is the first of its kind to compare psychotropic medication use in heart attack survivors and victims of sudden cardiac death.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research proves the feasibility of leadless pacing in heart failure patients with ultrasound-mediated stimulation energy. The new study published in the June edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, sought to apply ultrasound-mediated leadless pacing technology in heart failure patients and to evaluate the effects of respiration and body posture on the acoustic window. The study is the first of its kind to demonstrate successful leadless pacing in human subjects with advanced heart failure.

WASHINGTON, DC — The Heart Rhythm Society applauds the passage of H.R. 1380, the “Josh Miller HEARTS Act,” a legislation that establishes a federal grant program to help fund the placement of automated electronic defibrillators (AEDs) at elementary and secondary schools across the country. While also requiring school personnel to receive training in the operation of AEDs, the legislation will increase public awareness of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and the importance of AEDs in schools.

Lack of awareness and treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) puts African Americans at greater risk of death from the condition, according to a new national survey released today by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). The survey findings uncovered significant perception gaps between healthcare providers and consumers when it comes to understanding the condition, its symptoms, risk factors and treatments. Responsible for more than 350,000 U.S. deaths each year, SCA occurs when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. Approximately 95 percent of SCA cases result in death; however, it is proven most deadly in African Americans.

WASHINGTON – New research strongly indicates the need for a revision of criteria to effectively evaluate the presence of right ventricular structural, functional and electrical abnormalities. A recent study, published in the July edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, analyzed the clinical characteristics and diagnostic evaluation including genetic testing of a large group of patients newly identified with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D). The study is the largest of its kind and included over one hundred newly diagnosed ARVC/D patients.

WASHINGTON, DC — The Heart Rhythm Society applauds the introduction of Senate Resolution SRES 220 which calls for the designation of September as National Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Awareness Month. The resolution reinforces the need to raise awareness and garner support for initiatives affecting AF, a condition that impacts roughly 2.2 million Americans.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research reveals T-wave morphology parameters contain predictive value for mortality in the general population, independent of other clinical risk factors. A study published in the August edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, indicates that T-wave morphology parameters may allow health care professionals to better assess arrhythmia vulnerability in patients, and the prognostic value is uniquely related to cardiovascular mortality and seems to be gender specific.

WASHINGTON, DC — The ICD Registry™, a repository of ICD implantation data developed through a partnership of the Heart Rhythm Society and the American College of Cardiology Foundation, has released the ICD Registry Annual Report 2008. This is the third annual review of the Registry and is published in the September edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society.

WASHINGTON – The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), today released the HRS/ACCF Expert Consensus Statement on Pacemaker Device and Mode Selection.The expert consensus statement was developed in collaboration with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, endorsed by the American Heart Association, and published online today as part of the August edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, as well as the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The statement is the first of its kind to specifically address pacemaker device and mode selection, expanding upon the ACC/AHA/HRS 2008 guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities.

WASHINGTON, DC — New research shows magnetic interference from portable headphones has a clinically significant impact on the function of life-saving devices, according to a new study published in the October edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society. The study is the largest and most complete of its kind and uncovers a need for greater dialogue between doctors and patients with implanted cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and pacemakers.

WASHINGTON, DC —More than 250,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). In fact, SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer or AIDS. Yet, according to a recent survey issued by the Heart Rhythm Society, more than 70 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack.

WASHINGTON, DC — New findings indicate reduced heart rate recovery in combination with heightened T-wave alternans is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause death in low-risk populations. The study, published in the December edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, reveals routine exercise testing could allow health professionals to assess cardiovascular mortality based on the measurement of heart rate recovery and T-wave alternans.

WASHINGTON, April 1, 2010 — New findings confirm atrial fibrillation (AF) is independently associated with the risk of all forms of dementia, including Alzheimer’s and other senile and vascular dementia types. According to a study published in the April edition of the HeartRhythm Journal, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the presence of atrial fibrillation indicated higher mortality rates in all dementia subtypes; however, mortality risk was most prominent in the youngest population studied.

DENVER, May 13, 2010 – According to a sub-study of the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-CRT (MADIT-CRT), left ventricular (LV) leads positioned in the apical region when compared to the mid-ventricular or basal regions are associated with a significantly increased risk of heart failure (HF) and death in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The late-breaking clinical trial presented today at Heart Rhythm 2010, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 31st Annual Scientific Sessions, is the first trial to evaluate clinical outcomes based on the LV lead position within a mildly symptomatic CRT patient population.

The Pulse of Accomplishment documents the projects and achievements for Society departments and initiatives, including membership and member services, image and identity, education, health policy, fundraising, and the International Board of Heart Rhythm Examiners (IBHRE).

Over the four days of the meeting all the aspects of cardiac arrhythmias, from epidemiology, to pathophysiology, natural history of heart rhythms, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment, will be simultaneously dealt in 11 different rooms by over 400 invited speakers, all internationally renowned leaders in the field of clinical arrhythmology, electrophysiology and cardiac pacing.

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) has released a first-of-its-kind expert consensus statement on three specific cardiovascular disorders that also involve the autonomic nervous system. The 2015 Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia, and Vasovagal Syncope was written by an international group of experts and presented today at Heart Rhythm 2015, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 36th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Members of the Heart Rhythm Society visited 35 congressional offices on Capitol Hill to raise visibility and support for two proposals: the “Medicare Program Integrity Improvement and Education Act” and the “Teaching Children to Save Lives Act.” HRS is advocating for the support of these two bills because both intend to deliver outcomes aligned with the Society’s mission to improve the care of patients by advancing research, education and optimal health care policies and standards.

Yesterday, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) submitted a written testimony to the Senate Committee on Finance to share its views on Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) in the Medicare Program. HRS provided comments regarding the regulatory burden associated with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) program integrity activities that negatively impact physicians and physician group practices.

Dr. Ngai Yin Chan became a member of the Society in 2011 and was advanced to Fellow of the Heart Rhythm Society in 2012. He is one of over 100 members of the Society who reside in China, the second-largest population of Society members outside of North America.

The Heart Rhythm Society announces the appointment of Peng-Sheng Chen, MD, FHRS, as the new editor-in-chief of HeartRhythm, the official journal of HRS. Effective January 2014, Dr. Chen will replace Douglas Zipes, MD, FHRS, who will have served as editor-in-chief for ten years after founding the Journal in 2004. Currently, Dr. Chen is the Professor of Medicine, Director of the Krannert Institute of Cardiology and the Division of Cardiology, and Medtronic-Zipes Chair in Cardiology at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana. Additionally, Dr. Chen is an associate editor on the HeartRhythm editorial board and has served on the Journal’s editorial board since 2005.

The Training and Credentialing Committee of the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) launched a comprehensive review of advanced electrophysiology (EP) fellowships in an effort to ensure the highest possible standards for training programs and practitioners in the field. The report, Recommendations for Advanced Fellowship Training in Clinical Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology, expands upon guidelines published in 2005 and a supplemental consensus statement issued by PACES and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) in 2008.  This new report will be featured in the May edition of HeartRhythm, the official journal of HRS.

BOSTON – For the first time, a significant and direct correlation has been shown between the specific region of the body where obese individuals carry their weight and the increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD).  Specifically, obese individuals with an “apple” shape figure, or larger waste-to-hip ratio (WHR), are at greater risk than those with a more “pear” shaped figure, or smaller WHR. 

BOSTON – A study of more than 350 competitive athletes with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) from around the world showed for the first time that sports may be safer for this group than has been thought.  There were no occurrences of death or injury due to arrhythmia or shock during sports in this group.  Additionally, only ten percent of the athletes received a shock during competition or practice and of those, most continued to play, as reported today at Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions.

The meeting will present current and future management on sudden cardiac death, new drug and ablation treatment for atrial fibrillation, pacing and ICD advances, cardiac resynchronization techniques, remote patient monitoring, and advances in neuromodulation for heart failure and hypertension. The well received certificate Cardiac Rhythm Management Course will continue, and new courses on EPS/ECG added.

BOSTON – The Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) release the PACES/HRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Management of the Asymptomatic Young Patient with a Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW, Ventricular Preexcitation) Electrocardiographic Pattern.  The expert consensus statement presented today at Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions, provides first-of-its-kind clinical practice guidelines on the evaluation and management of asymptomatic young patients with a WPW electrocardiographic pattern.

BOSTON – A retrospective analysis of data from the OMNI Registry, a large-scale, longitudinal registry of nearly 3,000 heart device patients, revealed that primary prevention non-evidence-based (NEB) implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) recipients had similar therapeutic benefits and outcomes as evidence-based (EB) ICD recipients.  These findings are being presented today at Heart Rhythm 2012, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 33rd Annual Scientific Sessions.

To support consumer education about heart rhythm disorders, the Heart Rhythm Society has launched a Citywide Awareness Campaign in Denver to improve knowledge about symptoms, warning signs, and available treatment options. The initiative takes place in conjuction with Heart Rhythm 2013, the Society's 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.