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The topic covered by this document includes the monitoring of CIEDs with a description of the technology, indications for use, personnel involved in monitoring and the frequency and types of monitoring events. Also covered are issues in regard to data management, regulatory environments, reimbursement and ethical considerations in respect to device inactivation.

This document has been retired and replaced by 2015 "HRS Expert Consensus Statement on Remote Interrogation and Monitoring for Cardiovascular Electronic Implantable Devices."

May 14, 2010 - This document was developed in collaboration with and endorsed by the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM); the American Heart Association (AHA), the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), and the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA). It focuses on patients nearing the end of life and addresses patients who have made a decision for CIED deactivation at other times, as well as the rights and responsibilities of clinicians (and others, such as industry-employed allied professionals) who may not wish to perform deactivation.

November 19, 2015 - The benefits and risks of ICD therapy for patients are directly impacted by the programming and surgical decisions made by the clinician. This expert consensus statement systemically describes four important clinical issues and addresses programming of: bradycardia mode and rate, tachycardia detection, tachycardia therapy, and intraprocedural testing of defibrillation efficacy.

December 13, 2005 — This is the first study designed to look at the relation between patient outcomes and physicians'/hospitals' volume of cardioverter-defibrillator implantation to determine whether implantation should be limited to physicians with high procedural volume.

Pacemaker

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Pacemakers are devices that are implanted into the body, just below the collarbone, to take over the job of the heart’s own electrical system and prevent slow heart rates. Although they weigh only an ounce and are the size of a large wristwatch face, a pacemaker contains a computer with memory and electrical circuits, a powerful battery (generator), and special wires called “leads.” The generator creates electrical impulses that are carried by the leads to the heart muscle, signaling it to pump.

Defibrillation, or shock, can be the only way to stop certain heart arrhythmias, or irregular heartbeats, before they kill. If the heart beats too quickly, the chambers, or ventricles, will not have enough time to fill with blood and pump blood to the rest of the body, which can cause death. For people at high risk for the deadliest forms of arrhythmias – called ventricular tachycardia and ventricu­lar fibrillation – an internal “shocking” device may be the best protection against sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).