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The heart is a fist-sized muscle that pumps blood through the body 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, without rest. The normal heart is made up of four parts: two atria on the top of the heart (right atrium and left atrium), and two ventricles (right ventricle and left ventricle), the muscular chambers on the bottom that provide the major power to pump blood. These four chambers are connected by valves that allow blood to move forward and prevent it from flowing backwards. Coronary arteries, or blood vessels, deliver a constant, nourishing supply of blood to the heart muscle.

With each heartbeat, the heart contracts (or squeezes) and relaxes. Every contraction pushes blood out of the two pumping chambers (ventricles). When the heart relaxes, the ventricles refill with blood. Ejection fraction (EF) refers to the amount, or percentage, of blood that is pumped (or ejected) out of the ventricles with each contraction. 

Many people with AFib feel no symptoms at all. They do not know they have AFib or that there is a problem. Others can tell as soon as it happens. The symptoms of AFib are different for each person. This depends on age, the cause of the AFib (such as heart problems or other diseases), and on how much AFib affects the pumping of the heart.

Millions of people experience irregular heartbeats, called arrhythmias, at some point in their lives. Most of the time, they are harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious or even deadly. Having other types of heart disease can also increase the risk of arrhythmias. Heart dieases and disorders, or arrhythmias, can be electrical, circulatory, or structural in origin.

HeartRhythm is rooted in fundamental discovery and clinical applicability, and our editorial team is always looking for innovative ways to bring the latest science-based and original research to the global EP community. In the last year alone, the number of submissions has significantly increased, with a growing presence of international studies. To reflect the advancement of research and our expanding international collaboration, we have made great efforts to enhance your journal experience.

The EP field has always been driven by innovation. In the upcoming year, we will continue to focus on the fast-paced evolution of our field. As we prepare for our next annual meeting, you can expect to see even more groundbreaking science, innovation, and methods designed to clinical outcomes in our patients. Heart Rhythm 2017 is quickly approaching and I want to share an initial overview of what to expect and upcoming dates to keep in mind.