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The heart’s electrical system is responsible for making and conducting signals that trigger the heart to beat. These signals prompt the heart’s muscle to contract. With each contraction, blood is pumped throughout the body. The process begins in the upper chambers of the heart (atria), which pump blood into the lower chambers (ventricles).

The most common cause of SCA is a dangerous and abnormal heart rhythm called ventricular fibrillation (VF). In VF, the electrical signals that control the lower chambers of the heart (ventricles) become chaotic. This sends the ventricles into fibrillation, an extremely rapid and irregular quivering that cannot effectively pump blood to the body.

Atrial flutter (AFL) is a common abnormal heart rhythm, similar to atrial fibrillation, the most common abnormal heart rhythm. Both conditions are types of supraventricular (above the ventricles) tachycardia (rapid heart beat). In AFL, the upper chambers (atria) of the heart beat too fast, which results in atrial muscle contractions that are faster than and out of sync with the lower chambers (ventricles).

EP Live 2018

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EP Live is a 2-day intensive educational meeting targeting practicing electrophysiologists as well as fellows in training. The meeting consists of four sections: AF ablation, VT ablation, devices and new technologies. In addition, a panel of recognized experts will provide commentary and discussion. Previously recorded cases will also be shown.

By far, the Global CardioVascular Clinical Trialists Forum (CVCT), now in its 14th year, provides the best annual update and in-depth understanding of the trials shaping the evidence base of modern cardiology.

Join academics, trialists, regulators, R&D experts and young investigators for an interactive exchange covering all areas of CV trials. CVCT Forum is the only event focusing specifically on clinical trials in cardiovascular disease that brings together key decision makers, conceivers of clinical trial protocols, investigators, regulatory authorities, clinical research associations, cardiologists, general practitioners, epidemiologists and industry.