Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs when the heart stops beating, abruptly and without warning. If this happens, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs.

In addition, if the heartbeat is not restored with an electrical shock immediately, death follows within minutes. SCA accounts for more than 350,000 deaths in the U.S. each year and is one of the leading causes of death in the United States each year. In fact, SCA claims one life every 90 seconds, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer or AIDS. Unfortunately, 95 percent of people who experience SCA die as a result, mainly because treatment within minutes is not accessible.

What Causes Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)?

The most common cause of SCA is a dangerous and abnormal heart rhythm called ventricular fibrillation (VF). In VF, the electrical signals that control the lower chambers of the heart (ventricles) become chaotic.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) - Who's At Risk?

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without warning, and two-thirds of SCA deaths occur without any prior indications of heart disease. In fact, SCA can happen to people of all ages and health conditions.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Prevention

The time it takes for help and treatment to occur is a life and death situation during SCA. Ninety-five percent of those who experience SCA die because they do not receive life-saving defibrillation within four to six minutes, before brain and permanent death begin to occur.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Risk Assessment

The SCA Risk Assessment is an interactive tool designed to help individuals estimate their risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), a common cardiac arrhythmia that can occur abruptly and without warning. In fact, two-thirds of SCA deaths occur without any prior indications of heart disease.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Awareness

More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). In fact, SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS.